we employed it as a sort of lever to hoist our dead-weights from the house

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Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Jane Eyre Chapter 17

Quotation: "We did; and, Tedo, you know, I helped you in prosecuting (or persecuting) your tutor, whey-faced Mr. Vining--the parson in the pip, as we used to call him. He and Miss Wilson took the liberty of falling in love with each other--at least Tedo and I thought so; we surprised sundry tender glances and sighs which we interpreted as tokens of 'la belle passion,' and I promise you the public soon had the benefit of our discovery; we employed it as a sort of lever to hoist our dead-weights from the house. Dear mama, there, as soon as she got an inkling of the business, found out that it was of an immoral tendency. Did you not, my lady-mother?"

Context: Theodore Ingram were saying how he played tricks on his governesses.
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Hi everyone! I don't quite understand the bold part. I try to interpret it as "we employ it (= our discover = what suggested the two fell in love) as a sort of lever to hoist our dead-weights (similar to 'burden', here referring to his tutor and governess) from the house ("as a s sort....from the house" essentially means 'remove his tutor and governess from the house')". Is it correct? The expression seems to be 'indirect'. I try to 'direct' it. :D
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Normally I would interpret "hoist our dead-weights" as meaning "hoist ourselves," but here it appears to refer to the tutor and Miss Wilson. The children used the discovery they made as a way of getting the tutor etc. off their backs and out of the house.
     
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