We have a crisis here, & you stroll/are strolling in late?

flamboyant lad

Senior Member
Hindi
It's from the movie "The Mask"

Scenario: Someone has robbed the bank where Stanley Ipkiss works.

Stanley's boss reprimands Stanley for being late: We have a crisis here, and you stroll in an hour late?

I would have said that sentence either in Present continuous or in Present Perfect.

Self-made: We have a crisis here, and you are strolling/have strolled in an hour late?

Which sentence is grammatically correct?
 
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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Both are grammatically correct, but only the first one is idiomatic (for me). If you want to use "strolling," you could say:
    We have a crisis there, and you come strolling in an hour late?

    There is a strong note of criticism here, which the urgency of "crisis" and the casualness of "stroll" conveys – and "come strolling" plays the same role. But "are strolling" is a simple statement of fact, which doesn't do the same job.
     
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    flamboyant lad

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Hello guys!

    As per my knowledge we use Simple Present for:
    1. We use it for habits or things that we do regularly. e.g.
    I play tennis every Tuesday.
    I get up at seven o'clock every day
    .

    2. We use it for a situation that we think is more or less permanent. e.g.
    I live in New Delhi.

    We have a crisis here, and you stroll in an hour late?
    But neither of those rules tells me to use Simple Present in the talked about sentence.

    So could you please tell me why you think it's correct to express that sentence in Simple Present?

    Thanks a million in advance.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It's as Copyright and Kate have said. This isn't a simple statement of fact; it's a criticism, an angry reaction. The underlying meaning is: We have an emergency situation, and you dare to stroll in an hour late (to stroll is to move in a leisurely, casual manner, as if everything is okay).
     

    flamboyant lad

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Hi guys!

    Self-made definition: I guess "stroll in" here means "Phrasal Verb to enter walking in a leisurely way"

    Am I right?

    Many thanks in advance.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Flamboyant lad, this looks like the present simple as used in, for example, sports commentaries: He shoots, he scores! The present simple is used here as a vivid description of actions.
     

    flamboyant lad

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Hello guys!
    I've read in one of my grammar books that sometimes we use Present Simple in narratives and anecdotes to highlight an event.

    Is that the reason the speaker used Present Simple instead of Present Perfect/Present Continuous in the discussed sentence?
    Stanley's boss reprimands Stanley for being late: We have a crisis here, and you stroll in an hour late?

    I would have said that sentence either in Present continuous or in Present Perfect.

    Self-made: We have a crisis here, and you are strolling/have strolled in an hour late?
    Will it be incorrect if I say that sentence in Present Perfect or Present Continuous?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Will it be incorrect if I say that sentence in present perfect or present continuous?
    It would have a different meaning, which would not make much sense in the circumstances. The original sentence is the one that makes sense to a native speaker; it is said in an angry tone of voice, and "are strolling" or "have strolled" would not sound the same.
     

    flamboyant lad

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Hello teachers!

    Could you please tell me some examples where Simple Present is used in the same way?

    You know I need some more examples to understand it properly.

    Hope I'm not bothering too much.

    Thanks a lot in advance.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The simple present sees the action simply as a fact. The continuous form sees it as an ongoing action or process.

    The speaker in the present case wants to highlight the fact itself, not the process.

    Similar examples (seeing the action as a fact, not a process):
    To start the engine, you put the key in the ignition and you switch on. Then you depress the clutch and move the gear lever to first gear, etc. etc.
     

    flamboyant lad

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Is this a correct use of Simple Present?

    Self-made: I'm starving & you give me a packet of biscuits to eat.(here the speaker wants proper lunch)
     

    flamboyant lad

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I'm starving and you give me a packet of biscuits to eat.

    1. Is it correct now?

    2. Will it be idiomatic if I say "I'm starving and you are giving me a packet of biscuits to eat"?(just double checking)
     

    AmaryllisBunny

    Senior Member
    The simple present sees the action simply as a fact. The continuous form sees it as an ongoing action or process...
    We have a crisis and you stroll in an hour late - seems appropriate as well, because the simple present contrasts the fact that it is not that simple. Adding "just" saying you just stroll in... works well too.

    So... stroll in, come strolling in, etc., seem fine.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm starving and you give me a packet of biscuits to eat.

    1. Is it correct now?

    2. Will it be idiomatic if I say "I'm starving and you are giving me a packet of biscuits to eat"?(just double checking)
    The first one is more accusatory ... and I think the intonation would be "and you give me a packet of biscuits?"

    I wouldn't use the second one for the same effect.
     
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