We have come from far away, We have come from close by near by?

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hectacon

Senior Member
Hindi
If someone asks me " where have you come from?"

=We have come from far away.
=We have come from close by near by?

are these two replies correct ?
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    If you make them into three replies, Hectacon, yes:
    We've come from far away.
    We've come from close by.
    We've come from near by.


    or (for 2 and 3):
    We haven't come far.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think the person will probably be disappointed by your very vague answers. The question was not "How far have you come?"
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I thought you had arrived on an alien planet.
    I can't tell you what the right answer is, I can only tell you the right questions as if you were in the UK or the USA and then possible answers. If it was my family and friends I would know where they had come from!
    Does your family talk to each other in English? Perhaps it's some sort of ritual or formulaic exchange of greetings which we can hardly comment on?
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I thought you had arrived on an alien planet.
    I can't tell you what the right answer is, I can only tell you the right questions as if you were in the UK or the USA and then possible answers. If it was my family and friends I would know where they had come from!
    Does your family talk to each other in English? Perhaps it's some sort of ritual or formulaic exchange of greetings which we can hardly comment on?
    Ha ha ha ha, Not my family but some of my relatives . who are settled outside my country. When they come back they do talk in English . And some of my business friends they don't know my native language. I also don't understand there's. So we speak in English.

    Actually It is some kind of informal talk. Suppose If a friend asks me Where you have been or where have you come from?

    I would say I was just nearby. I have come from faraway. they will automatically understand that I don't want tell them exactly where I was .

    Is this of any help? do you guys talk like this?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Do you guys talk like this?
    Not really, no, (but I'm a woman not a 'guy' so maybe I don't count). I can't imagine any situation like the one you describe. I can understand speaking English as a 'lingua franca', a common language. The language situation in India is of course completely different from that of the UK or USA.
    All my everyday friends and family are native speakers. I have a couple of non-native speaker friends in real life with whom I have to speak English because I can't speak their language and I have a couple of FaceBook friends.

    I can't think of anything in my life that resembles what you are talking about. If I get back very late from some rendezvous, my husband might ask in a friendly fashion 'Where have you been?' which means 'Why are you so late? I was getting worried'. These days I have the luxury of being accountable to nobody.

    When I was a teen my parents might have asked the same. If I didn't want to tell them, I'd say 'Nowhere!' I'd say the answer to 'How far have you come?' can only be 'Not far'.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Another possible exchange in English would be:

    A: Where were you?
    B: Out.
    A: Where out?
    B: None of your business.
    A: Well, was it somewhere near?
    B: Not far.
    A: How far?
    B: I'm going to bed.

    (bowdlerized version)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    (bowdlerized version)
    Right! But seriously, each culture uses English the way that suits it. I'm sure that the expletives deleteds aren't an option for hectacon.
    A sweet smile and a shoulder shrug can get a person a very long way.
     
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