We have left that building behind, passed it, crossed it

English nerd

Senior Member
Hindi
We're in a car. So my mom wants to stop at a restaurant. But my dad says:

We have left it behind.
We have crossed it.
We have passed it.

What should be used:left it behind/crossed it/passed it?

Thank you:)
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I'd expect "We passed it" or "went past it" with some words added to say it's been some time since you you passed it, or that you've gone far ahead. Just saying "We have passed it" isn't sufficient reason for not turning back (which seems to be what you mean). You might have passed it just a few seconds ago and there might be a convenient u-turn ahead.

    We passed/went past it twenty minutes ago. I can't turn back now.

    Did you try looking for earlier threads? This one asks a very similar question, with two of your three options.
    passed / walked past / left behind
     
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    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    You need "I can't turn back now...", not "I can't make a turn now".

    Do you mean instead of, or in addition to, saying they'd passed it? If you said it instead of those words, it'd sound very odd. But if you wanted to add those words, you could.
     

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Is the use of "we're 2 miles ahead of the restaurant." natural?
    Could we say "I cant make a turn now because we are 2 miles ahead of the restaurant" in the same scenario?
    Do you mean instead of, or in addition to, saying they'd passed it? If you said it instead of those words, it'd sound very odd. But if you wanted to add those words, you could.
    So do you mean that it can't be used?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Is the use of "we're 2 miles ahead of the restaurant." natural?
    You need a separate thread for this. (But if you re-read my last post and think about what I said, you'll get your answer.)
    So do you mean that it can't be used?
    Please read my last post again. I said it (Piyush Toplani's suggestion) would sound odd as a replacement for "We passed it X minutes ago", but could be said along with it.

    I'm assuming that your mother has said: Let's stop at ABC and get something to eat. And then your father replies.

    Mother: Let's stop at ABC and get something to eat.
    Father: I can't make a turn now because we are 2 miles ahead of the restaurant. - This doesn't seem a natural reply to me.

    Mother: Let's stop at ABC and get something to eat.
    Father: We passed it ten minutes ago. I can't turn back now. We've gone two miles ahead. :tick:
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    For American English:
    We are two miles ahead of the restaurant. :cross:Nonsense.
    The restaurant is two miles ahead of us. :thumbsdown: Correct sentence, but has the opposite meaning. We have not reached the restaurant.
    The restaurant is two miles behind us. :tick:
    We have left it behind. :confused: It sounds like we did not bring the restaurant with us when we left. :confused:

    We have already passed it (and give some reason why we can't turn around). :tick::tick:
     

    Piyush toplani

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    We are two miles ahead of the restaurant. :cross:Nonsense.
    The restaurant is two miles ahead of us. :thumbsdown: Correct sentence, but has the opposite meaning. We have not reached the restaurant.
    Thanks myridon....

    Would you please explain me a little bit more why "we wre two miles ahead of us" is wrong but if we make it opposite i.e. "the restaurant is 2 miles ahead of us" it is right grammatically?:)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's not about grammar it's about word choice. We use "ahead of" for moving objects. We are driving a car and the restaurant is two miles ahead of us. If we continue moving for two more miles we (us) will be at the restaurant.

    The other sentence, "we are two miles ahead of the restaurant", implies that if the restaurant just keeps moving it (restaurant) will catch up to us after traveling two miles. But restaurants don't move.

    It would be okay to say the restaurant is two miles behind us. We could move in the opposite direction back to the restaurant. But we (us) are doing all the moving, not the restaurant.
     
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    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'Ahead of us' means '2 miles away - in front of us, or in the direction we are heading'. The restaurant can be there, but we obviously can't.


    Cross-posted.
     

    Piyush toplani

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    It's not about grammar it's about word choice. We use "ahead of" for moving objects. We are driving a car and the restaurant is two miles ahead of us. If we continue moving for two more miles we (us) will be at the restaurant.

    The other sentence, "we are two miles ahead of the restaurant", implies that if the restaurant just keeps moving it (restaurant) will catch up to us after traveling two miles. But restaurants don't move.

    It would be okay to say the restaurant is two miles behind us. We could move in the opposite direction back to the restaurant. But we (us) are doing all the moving, not the restaurant.
    'Ahead of us' means '2 miles away - in front of us, or in the direction we are heading'. The restaurant can be there, but we obviously can't.


    Cross-posted.
    Thanks...:)
     

    Piyush toplani

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    You need a separate thread for this. (But if you re-read my last post and think about what I said, you'll get your answer.)

    Please read my last post again. I said it (Piyush Toplani's suggestion) would sound odd as a replacement for "We passed it X minutes ago", but could be said along with it.

    I'm assuming that your mother has said: Let's stop at ABC and get something to eat. And then your father replies.

    Mother: Let's stop at ABC and get something to eat.
    Father: I can't make a turn now because we are 2 miles ahead of the restaurant. - This doesn't seem a natural reply to me.

    Mother: Let's stop at ABC and get something to eat.
    Father: We passed it ten minutes ago. I can't turn back now. We've gone two miles ahead. :tick:
    Thanks..:)
     

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    And what about:
    We have come a long way ahead.
    Or simply
    We have come ahead.

    So what should be used : come a long way ahead or come ahead"?

    I guess the first one sounds okay. Or are neither of them natural?
    Context is the same.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Neither of those sound natural to me.

    Since you are doing the moving, things are said in relation to where you are, not the thing that's not moving.

    It's a long way behind us.

    We have gone a long way past it.
     
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