We have resolved the issue with occasional crashes

angelina19

New Member
estonian/russian
I have trouble understanding this sentence:

We have resolved the issue with occasional crashes when exiting the program.

which of the following does it convey?

1. We fixed the occasional crashes that occurred when exiting the program.
2. When we were exiting the program we resolved the issue of the occasional crashes.
 
  • angelina19

    New Member
    estonian/russian
    This is a stand-alone sentence in a monthly bug report from one of the developer's teams at work. They just have a list of issues they fixed. so there is no more context. It literally is just a list looking like this:

    Bug report
    1. We fixed this.
    2. We fixed that.
    3. etc.

    I know for a fact that the program used to irregularly crash when the exit icon was clicked. I suppose this is the one that they fixed. but the wording of the sentence feels confusing to me. i can see both meanings suggested above.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    We have resolved the issue with occasional crashes when exiting the program.
    It is meaning 1: The problem was: sometimes when the user exited the program, something would crash.
    (It is not clear what "crash" means. Maybe it means the entire PC would die.). We fixed that problem.
     

    angelina19

    New Member
    estonian/russian
    It is meaning 1: The problem was: sometimes when the user exited the program, something would crash.
    (It is not clear what "crash" means. Maybe it means the entire PC would die.). We fixed that problem.
    The issues with occasional program crash after clicking exit have been resolved.


    Would this be a more clear phrasing of this situation?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    It is one issue, not "issues". There was one bug-fix.

    The issue with occasional program crashing (on clicking "exit") has been resolved.
     

    cidertree

    Senior Member
    Béarla na hÉireann (Hiberno-English)
    Another reading of "We have resolved the issue with occasional crashes when exiting the program" would be "We have resolved the issue with by introducing occasional crashes when exiting the program - presumably not what was intended.

    The issue of intermittent program crash-on-exit has been resolved.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "With" is a bad choice in that context. It makes a confusing sentence. They only had one idea in mind when they wrote the sentence but they didn't realize it sort of fits two different ideas. That happens sometimes. You only see the meaning you were thinking about if you don't re-read the sentence objectively.

    We have resolved the issue with by means of using occasional crashes when exiting the program. :thumbsdown:

    It's the same use of "with" as "We fixed the leaky joint with waterproof tape".

    Like I said, "with" was a bad choice. In that context, it makes no logical sense but it is a possible way to read the sentence.

    This is much better because it's not ambiguous:

    We have resolved the issue of occasional crashes when exiting the program. :thumbsup:
     
    Last edited:

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    How do you know about the ”issues”? That could shape the response. For example:

    Users have notified us about crashes when exiting the program. This patch eliminates that problem.
     
    Top