We indented (on headquarters) for supplies.

PureLand

Senior Member
Chinese
According to Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary,

indent
[no object] British : to order something from the person or place that can supply it

We indented (on headquarters) for supplies.

I have no idea what (on headquarters) means here.:confused: Thank you! :)

As far as I know,
at (the) ~
They're very worried about this at headquarters. She works at the company's headquarters.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It appears to me to be a military context, where headquarters is also the supply base. I was puzzled by the addition of "on", but when I checked in OED I found this usage is correct; it is also obsolete. It originated in the British Army in India in the early nineteenth century and the most recent citation is 1899.
     

    PureLand

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I haven't seen that use of 'indent'. As the definition says, it means they ordered some supplies from headquarters. No article needed.
    It appears to me to be a military context, where headquarters is also the supply base. I was puzzled by the addition of "on", but when I checked in OED I found this usage is correct; it is also obsolete. It originated in the British Army in India in the early nineteenth century and the most recent citation is 1899.
    I see, thanks so much for your explanations, Bennymix and Uncle Jack! :D
     
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