we learn how to touch things we see...

TrungstXVI

Senior Member
Vietnam
"It is not only colours and sounds and so on that are absent from the scientific world of matter, but also space as we get it through sight or touch. It is essential to science that its matter should be in a space, but the space in which it is cannot be exactly the space we see or feel. To begin with, space as we see it is not the same as space as we get it by the sense of touch; it is only by experience in infancy that we learn how to touch things we see, or how to get a sight of things which we feel touching us. But the space of science is neutral as between touch and sight; thus it cannot be either the space of touch or the space of sight."

(The Problems of Philosphy, Bertrand Russell, chapter III)

How should I understand the bold text?
I think the author meant that: it is only by experience in infancy that we learn the way we perceive when we touch things we see, or the way we perceice when we get a sight of things which we feel touching us.

Is my understanding correct?
 
  • Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    I'm not quite sure what you mean by your sentence.

    Russell's meaming might be expressed this way:
    It is only by experience in infancy that we learn the relation between what we see and what we touch.
     
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