~we live in a world of hatred... but I don't see that()...

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The following is the introduction scene which shows real documentary footage of the most miscellaneous of groups and couples at the arrivals gate at Hearthrow Airport.

PM : (VO) Whenever I get gloomy with the state of the world, I think about the Arrivals Gate at Hearthrow Airport. General opinion's starting to make out that we live in a world of hatred and greed... but I don't see that... seems to me that love is everywhere. Often it's not particularly dignified, or newsworthy... but it's always there... fathers and sons, mothers and daughters, husbands and wives, boyfriends, girlfriends, old friends.
<Of the movie Love Actually>
I'd like to know if "we live in a world of hatred and greed" is implied after "that."
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Glasguensif, for another kind answer from you. :)
    If so, I think "see" means "know" here.
    Then I was wondering if you think "I don't see that" matches the context; I think "I don't see in such a way" is more proper.
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    No, see means "perceive" here. You could say "I don't see it in such a way", where it refers to the world. But that is really a paraphrasing and not an equivalence.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Galsguensis, for your continuing support. :)
    I'm so sorry for my ignorance.
    Then I think I should say "see" mean "think."
    And I was wondering "I don't see that" is idiomatic, not "I don't think of that" or "I don't think we live in a world of hatred and greed."
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    See doesn't mean think either. This is apparently a use of "see" which you haven't come across, but which is very common and entirely idiomatic.
     
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