We sometimes argue

Me.

New Member
Hiya!
I wasn't sure if this goes in here but hey. I was wondering if anybody knew the correct way to say "we sometimes argue"? I figured that most translation sites don't give you the right word order (either that or I haven't found a good one yet). Thanks.
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Hi and welcome! :)

    My suggestions:
    Wir streiten manchmal.
    Ab und zu streiten wir.

    Could you give more context? Is it a friendly spat?

    Jana
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Wir streiten uns manchmal.

    The word order depends on context and emphasis.

    A:
    Streitet Ihr Euch manchmal?

    B:
    (1) Ja, manchmal streiten wir uns.
    (2) Ja, wir streiten uns schon ab und zu.

    Kajjo
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Sich streiten*
    Drache wollte ausdrücken, daß das Verb "streiten" meistens reflexiv verwendet wird. Ich hatte in meinen obigen Beispielen dies bereits versucht zum Ausdruck zu bringen. Beide Formen sind jedoch formal korrekt. Es erfordert ein relativ hohes Maß an Sprachgefühl, diese beiden Formen im Alltag korrekt anzuwenden. In den meisten Fällen ist die reflexive Form vorzuziehen.

    Wir streiten oft miteinander.
    Wir streiten uns oft.
    Ach, sie streitet zu gerne!
    Streitet ihr euch oft?
    Er streitet sich gerade mit seiner Schwester.

    Kajjo
     

    Lykurg

    Senior Member
    German
    Meiner Meinung nach paßt hier nur die reflexive Bedeutung:
    "Wir streiten uns manchmal."
    "Ab und zu streiten wir uns."

    "Wir streiten manchmal (miteinander)" würde ich, wenn der Kontext nicht ganz eindeutig das Gegenteil zeigt, als veralteten Ausdruck für gemeinsames Kämpfen verstehen.
    "Wann wir streiten* Seit' an Seit'..." ;)

    __________
    *Die erste Strophe eines Arbeiterlieds von 1916 lautet:
    "Wann wir schreiten Seit' an Seit' / und die alten Lieder singen / und die Wälder wiederklingen, / fühlen wir, es muß gelingen: / Mit uns zieht die neue Zeit."
     

    DerDrache

    Banned
    English/US
    That is a thousand times less useful than no comment at all.

    Is it a correction?

    A suggestion?

    Two words with an asterisk in response to someone who has given suggestions is, at the least, impolite.

    Gaer
    Her examples called for the reflexive...my indication was pretty clear. Should I have typed out a paragraph, blessed her, and then said she needs to use reflexive?

    Thanks. ;)

    EDIT: That said, she definitely knows a lot more German than me. I wasn't/am not attempting to be pompous or anything, just making a correction.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Drache wollte ausdrücken, daß das Verb "streiten" meistens reflexiv verwendet wird. Ich hatte in meinen obigen Beispielen dies bereits versucht zum Ausdruck zu bringen.
    Kajjo, I read your post. I always pay very close attention to whatever you write. And know that. Right? :)
    The word order depends on context and emphasis.

    A:

    Wir streiten uns manchmal.

    Streitet Ihr Euch manchmal?

    B:
    (1) Ja, manchmal streiten wir uns.
    (2) Ja, wir streiten uns schon ab und zu.
    You could not have been more clear. :)
    Beide Formen sind jedoch formal korrekt. Es erfordert ein relativ hohes Maß an Sprachgefühl, diese beiden Formen im Alltag korrekt anzuwenden. In den meisten Fällen ist die reflexive Form vorzuziehen.

    Wir streiten oft miteinander.
    Wir streiten uns oft.
    This is actually much like English.

    I could say:

    We often fight.

    However, without clear context, you might say: "Who?"

    Wir streiten oft miteinander.
    We often fight with each other.

    Wir streiten uns oft.
    We often fight with each other.

    This is a "German bonus". It allows you to express "with each other" by using a pronoun. ;)
    Ach, sie streitet zu gerne!
    This is different, isn't it? Here you are talking about someone who just likes to argue, right?

    The one below is the only one that suprised me:
    Er streitet sich gerade mit seiner Schwester.
    I would not know to use reflexive there!

    Gaer
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Ach, sie streitet zu gerne! This is different, isn't it? Here you are talking about someone who just likes to argue, right?
    Yes, you are right.

    I would not know to use reflexive there!
    ...but it is typical!

    Michael und Susanne streiten sich gerade!
    Gestern haben sich zwei Damen im Bus heftig gestritten.
    Haben wir beide uns
    jemals gestritten?

    Kajjo
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    ...but it is typical!

    1) Michael und Susanne streiten sich gerade!
    2) Gestern haben sich zwei Damen im Bus heftig gestritten.
    3) Haben wir beide uns jemals gestritten?

    Kajjo
    4) Er streitet sich gerade mit seiner Schwester.

    For me this a little bit different. In the first three sentences I expect the reflexive. It makes it 100% clear that two (or more) people are fighting or have fought with each other/among themselves.

    In the fourth sentence "he" is fighting "with" his sister.

    This is where Googling gets me in BIG trouble:

    Results 1 - 10 of about 169 for "Er streitet mit".
    Results 1 - 10 of about 226 for "Er streitet sich mit".

    This shows only frequency. It could be that all those 169 hits do nothing more than point out how often sub-standard German is used.

    If I were ever to write such a sentence (almost 100% unlikely), I would use "sich" merely because the advice of a literate native is worth 10 million hits. :)

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Meiner Meinung nach paßt hier nur die reflexive Bedeutung:
    "Wir streiten uns manchmal."
    "Ab und zu streiten wir uns."

    "Wir streiten manchmal (miteinander)" würde ich, wenn der Kontext nicht ganz eindeutig das Gegenteil zeigt, als veralteten Ausdruck für gemeinsames Kämpfen verstehen. "Wenn wir streiten Seit' an Seit'..."^^
    If you have read my posts, you know that my main purpose here is always to learn. "Feel" is impossible to explain. For me it is enough to know that you all pick the reflexive by reflex, if you'll pardon the awful pun. ;)

    What was especially interesting to me was your objection to "miteinander".

    As a non-native I can only look at hits. I can't speed-read an entire page and immediately get a "feel" for the context.

    Results 1 - 10 of about 36 for "streiten wir miteinander".
    Results 1 - 10 of about 23,700 for "streiten wir uns".

    Results 1 - 10 of about 26,300 for "wir streiten uns".
    Results 1 - 10 of about 48 for "wir streiten miteinander".

    Does that result agree with your own instinct? ;)

    Gaer
     

    Lykurg

    Senior Member
    German
    What was especially interesting to me was your objection to "miteinander".

    As a non-native I can only look at hits. I can't speed-read an entire page and immediately get a "feel" for the context.

    Results 1 - 10 of about 36 for "streiten wir miteinander".
    Results 1 - 10 of about 23,700 for "streiten wir uns".

    Results 1 - 10 of about 26,300 for "wir streiten uns".
    Results 1 - 10 of about 48 for "wir streiten miteinander".

    Does that result agree with your own instinct? ;)
    Yes, it does - "miteinander" was not too important for my statement. Being much less common goes quite well with my "archaic"-tag.
    My point was that the intransitive "wir streiten" implicates fighting side-by-side.

    Wir streiten uns um Kleinigkeiten, aber wir streiten für eine bessere Sprachbeherrschung. ;)
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Reflexive form:

    There is a form:
    Ich streite mich gerne. = Ich streite gerne. (I like to argue. The goal is to argue.)
    Ich streite mich gerne mit meiner Schwester.

    The reflexive form is indeed strange here, but very common.

    ---

    Meaning of "to argue"

    I'm not sure without context whether "streiten" is the best translation. If you have no context, usually it is.

    English: to argue = dispute; claim; give reasons

    But depending on context, it might be: diskutieren, herumdiskutieren, sticheln, herumsticheln

    ---

    "streiten" has the goal to win, to find a place in the hierarchy or to be glad about struggling.

    It may be a dispute and sometimes very loudly.

    "diskutieren" has the goal to win knowledge.

    "herumdiskutieren" means to dispute just to dispute.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Results 1 - 10 of about 1,980 for "streiten miteinander. (0.28 seconds)
    Results 1 - 10 of about 26,400 for "miteinander streiten. (0.05 seconds)

    I do not think "miteinander streiten" is archaic. But "wir streiten miteinander" is seldom used. Mostly, you speak about others. "Sie streiten schon wieder miteinander."

    Note: the count also includes forms like:
    "meckern, streiten, miteinander raufen, ..." where "miteinander" belongs to "raufen"



    Best regards
    Bernd
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    This shows only frequency. It could be that all those 169 hits do nothing more than point out how often sub-standard German is used.
    No, not at all, Gaer.

    1. Some of the hits (and the very first! :)) have just an inversed order: "er streitet mit sich selbst". Thus, some of the 169 are reflexive, too, and they do not contradict the rule.

    2. Using intransitive streiten is not wrong or sub-standard. If used correctly it is absolutely correct standard German.

    2a) (fighting for) "Er streitet für die Abschaffung der Probezeit..."
    2b) (discussing about) "Wir stritten erregt über die Einführung des Tempolimits."

    If I were ever to write such a sentence (almost 100% unlikely), I would use "sich" merely because the advice of a literate native is worth 10 million hits.
    The typical meaning of streiten is to argue. In all these cases you can safely use the reflexive form. By the way, I do not see why "Er streitet sich mit seiner Schwester." is special in any sense. It means he argued with his sister. Typical case in my point of view?!

    Kajjo
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi Kajjo,

    I think "Er streitet sich mit seiner Schwester." is strange not in grammar but in point of view. There is a German saying: "Zum Streiten gehören immer zwei". In this sense, the reflexive form is strange, because it refers only to one. But it is common and correct.

    Best regards
    Bernd
     

    Lykurg

    Senior Member
    German
    I do not think "miteinander streiten" is archaic. But "wir streiten miteinander" is seldom used. Mostly, you speak about others. "Sie streiten schon wieder miteinander."
    Ich meinte damit - und leider trug das "miteinander" nur zur Verwirrung bei - "gemeinsam in den Streit ziehen". Und das hat sich in Zeiten von ferngelenkten Massenvernichtungswaffen weitgehend erledigt.

    Reflexive form:

    There is a form:
    Ich streite mich gerne. = Ich streite gerne. (I like to argue. The goal is to argue.)
    Ich streite mich gerne mit meiner Schwester.

    The reflexive form is indeed strange here, but very common.
    Ich bin entgegengesetzter Meinung, ich halte die reflexive Form für richtig, die andere für fragwürdig. Das intransitive "streiten" würde ich mit "kämpfen" gleichsetzen, daher meine ich, daß "Ich streite mich gerne. != Ich streite gerne." ist. (Dem Rest des Beitrags stimme ich zu)

    2. Using intransitive streiten is not wrong or sub-standard. If used correctly it is absolutely correct standard German.

    2a) (fighting for) "Er streitet für die Abschaffung der Probezeit..."
    2b) (discussing about) "Wir stritten erregt über die Einführung des Tempolimits."
    2a stimme ich zu, in 2b fehlt nach meinem Empfinden ein "uns". Tatsächlich wird es häufig so gebraucht, das ist aber meiner Meinung nach eine gewisse Nachlässigkeit.

    I think "Er streitet sich mit seiner Schwester." is strange not in grammar but in point of view. There is a German saying: "Zum Streiten gehören immer zwei". In this sense, the reflexive form is strange, because it refers only to one. But it is common and correct.
    Siehe oben - nicht "strange", sondern regelkonform - sich streiten mit ...

    Könnte man hier über statt um sagen?
    Eigentlich hast du recht, "sich streiten über" ist gemeint - ich hatte diese Form allerdings bewußt als Intensivum verwendet: Über immaterielle Kleinigkeiten wird so heftig debattiert, als könne man sie besitzen (was "sich streiten um" ausdrückt).
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    2b: "Wir stritten erregt über die Einführung des Tempolimits." -- In 2b fehlt nach meinem Empfinden ein "uns". Tatsächlich wird es häufig so gebraucht, das ist aber meiner Meinung nach eine gewisse Nachlässigkeit.
    "Wir stritten uns erregt über die Einführung des Tempolimits." -- we were arguing about... and we had strongly opposing opinions -- Die reflexive Verwendung klingt immer nach einem richtigen Streit oder Zank.

    "Wir stritten erregt über die Einführung des Tempolimits." -- we were discussing about... -- Hier kann es sich durchaus um eine zivilisierte Unterhaltung von Gelehrten handeln, die unterschiedliche Standpunkte vertreten.

    Die intransitive Verwendung ist vielleicht altmodisch und selten, aber keineswegs nachlässig. Ganz im Gegenteil!

    Kajjo
     

    Lykurg

    Senior Member
    German
    Du hast mich hinsichtlich 2b überzeugt. - Ich habe inzwischen "streiten" im Grimm nachgeschlagen, der an wesentlichen Bedeutungen unterscheidet:
    http://germazope.uni-trier.de/Projects/WBB/woerterbuecher/dwb/wbgui?lemid=GS50337 said:
    A. sich im meinungsstreit auseinandersetzen.
    B. sich über ein streitobjekt auseinandersetzen.
    C. sich erbost auseinandersetzen; in zwietracht oder feindschaft begriffen sein.
    D. körperlich kämpfen.
    E. 'wetteifern, sich messen'
    F. einer reihe von meist übertragenen anwendungen liegt die allgemeine vorstellung des kämpfens zugrunde [...] G. [...]
    (Hervorhebungen von mir)

    Dort wird nicht wesentlich zwischen reflexiver und intransitiver Verwendung unterschieden, allerdings kommt in den Beispielen zu Kategorie D bis G "sich streiten" nicht mehr vor. Das berechtigt natürlich nicht den von mir gefühlsmäßig gezogenen sprachlichen Umkehrschluß.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top