we <would have arrived> in London around 8:00

JJXR

Senior Member
Russian
Hello to all,

Thanks for reading my post.


Context:

The speaker and his/her companion didn't get a flat tire while crossing a dangerous section of the road, they are now further down the road and there's no reason to expect that they will not arrive in London around 6:30. The speaker says the sentences below at 6:00.

Sample sentences:

1. If we had gotten a flat tire, we wouldn't arrive in London around 6:30. Rather, we would have arrived around 8:00.

2. If we had gotten a flat tire, we would have arrived in London around 8:00. As it is, we will arrive around 6:30.

Question:

Do the bolded tenses that I've used work?


Thanks a lot for any comments, corrections or suggestions!

Regards,
JJXR
 
Last edited:
  • JJXR

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thanks for the response, PaulQ.

    I think they do. But I have no way of knowing, so any comments would be greatly appreciated.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    You have no way of knowing what, exactly? You said: The speaker and his/her companion didn't get a flat tire (BE-tyre) while crossing a dangerous section of the road they are now further down the road and there's no reason to expect that they will not arrive in London around 6:30. The speaker says the sentences below at 6:00.

    So you know they didn't get a flat tyre, which means that your sentences, which begin with 'If we had gotten..' (got in BE), make no sense, because they didn't get a flat tyre......

    At 6:00 the speaker would have said:
    If we get a flat tyre we won't arrive in London by 6.30.
    If we don't get a flat tyre we will arrive in London by 6:30.


    That said, both are odd: why would people worry about flat tyres, unless of course they are aware that their tyres are wearing out (and who in their right mind would set out on a journey without checking their tyres?).

    I've said this before and I'll say it again: your sentences are very often contrived and illogical.
     
    Last edited:

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    The tenses in version (2) work for me, but not version (1).

    PS: It's a bizarre scenario to try and form a conditional sentence of any description from. :(

    [cross-posted]
     

    JJXR

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thanks for the responses, london calling and DonnyB.
    I've said this before and I'll say it again: your sentences are very often contrived and illogical.
    This is a grammar exercise. I want to understand how to use the conditional perfect tense correctly when referring to what is called a closed future possibility. I agree that the two examples are contrived. As for illogicality, it is debatable, however:

    In sentences #1 and #2 (post #1), the speaker wants his/her companion to imagine what would have happened if they had gotten a flat tire. The motivation for the speaker to start the sentences with "if we had gotten" is that it was highly likely for him/her and his/her companion to get a flat tire while crossing the dangerous section of the road. The risk was very high in the past. The speaker wants to draw his/her companion's attention to that point in time.
    If we get a flat tyre we won't arrive in London by 6.30.
    If we don't get a flat tyre we will arrive in London at 6:30.
    The two quoted sentences talk about an open future possibility. In this case, the speaker's companion's attention would be drawn to a point in time in the future.
    The tenses in version (2) work for me, but not version (1).
    I think my version #1 would work like this:

    1a. If we had gotten a flat tire, we wouldn't have been able to arrive in London around 6:30. Rather, we could have arrived around 8:00.

    I think "could have arrived" and "wouldn't have been able to arrive" work best because no one really knows what the future holds. In sentence #1a, the speculation is about the ability to arrive which would have been in the past on account of the imagined damage.
     
    Last edited:

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Sorry, no, because you stated initially that they didn't get a flat tyre and so your examples make no sense in the context which you gave us. The only ones which make sense in that context are the examples I provided, which express future possibility.

    In any case you have now changed the context. You now say: the speaker wants his/her companion to imagine what would have happened if they had gotten (got) a flat tire (tyre). That is a completely different scenario.

    You really must try and be more consistent.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top