wear out/off

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hectacon

Senior Member
Hindi
When should I use wear out and when should I use wear off. If I am confused with both and not certain of can I use erode.

The shoes have worn out/worn off.

My tooth have worn out/worn off.

My clothes have worn out/ worn off.

The tires have worn out/off.

The base of the kettle has worn out/worn off.
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    You need "wear out" in all your examples. The term "wear off" is usually used for non-tangible things. For instance: The effect of the drugs wore off.

    If you enter "wear out" in the search box you'll find older threads. The same probably applies to "wear off"; I haven't checked.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    You need "wear out" in all your examples. The term "wear off" is usually used for non-tangible things. For instance: The effect of the drugs wore off.

    If you enter "wear out" in the search box you'll find older threads. The same probably applies to "wear off"; I haven't checked.
    Aha you are back.:) No I searched for it, but there they are they are asking for something else. And with which other non-tangible I can used it.

    Excitement, Energy, Beauty, Lust?
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Excitement can wear off. I wouldn't use the term with the other three you suggested but perhaps someone else can think of a suitable context for them. In any case we can't make lists as per the forum rules.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Surfaces, and things on a surface, wear off - to wear off - in the case of surfaces/things on a surface, to degrade or diminish usually by rubbing and/or the effects of time, etc. They wear off whatever they are on.

    "I painted the door but, a year later, I saw that the paint had worn off at the place where people had been pushing the door."

    Abstracts, the effects of something, intangibles, especially emotions and feelings, wear off -> to wear off = to diminish in intensity, usually until there is none left.

    To wear out (usually of physical things, but occasionally used figuratively) - to lose shape or structure, or even disappear completely due to constant use. "I have walked across Punjab and now my shoes are worn out."
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Surfaces, and things on a surface, wear off - to wear off - in the case of surfaces/things on a surface, to degrade or diminish usually by rubbing and/or the effects of time, etc. They wear off whatever they are on.

    "I painted the door but, a year later, I saw that the paint had worn off at the place where people had been pushing the door."

    Abstracts, the effects of something, intangibles, especially emotions and feelings, wear off -> to wear off = to diminish in intensity, usually until there is none left.

    To wear out (usually of physical things, but occasionally used figuratively) - to lose shape or structure, or even disappear completely due to constant use. "I have walked across Punjab and now my shoes are worn out."
    But here, shoes have also eroded because of friction and with time.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    No, the primary reason is that the shoes have been used (all the shoe, not just the sole (the bottom)). You can understand "out" as "completely".

    You can say, "I have walked across Punjab and now the soles of my shoes have worn off." -> (i) the sole is a surface (ii) they were on the shoes and now they are off the shoes.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    No, the primary reason is that the shoes have been used (all the shoe, not just the sole (the bottom)). You can understand "out" as "completely".

    You can say, "I have walked across Punjab and now the soles of my shoes have worn off." -> (i) the sole is a surface (ii) they were on the shoes and now they are off the shoes.
    That means, If the thing has completely eroded than I should use worn out. Ok.

    Can I say, The base of the kettle(or any old utensil or metal) which still can be used. But the surface of that thing has eroded. Pics,





    The kettle has worn off a bit.


    The cricket ball has worn off.

     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Things are described as "worn out" when they can no longer be used at all for their purpose.

    It is wrong to say that the cricket ball has "worn off" - please pay attention: it is a surface or the surfaces of things that "wears off" - You can say, "Some of the red has worn off the cricket ball, but the cricket ball is not worn out - you can still play cricket with it."

    This cricket ball is worn out - it has been bowled and hit thousands of times - it is no longer suitable for playing cricket because, in parts, the stitching has worn off.

     
    Last edited:

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Things are described as "worn out" when they can no longer be used at all for their purpose.

    The cricket ball has not "worn off" - please pay attention: it is the surfaces of things that "wears off" - You can say, "Some of the red has worn off the cricket ball, but the cricket ball is not worn out - you can still play cricket with it."

    This cricket ball is worn out - it has been bowled and hit thousands of times - it is no longer suitable for playing cricket because, in parts, the stitching has worn off.

    Thank you, Now I understand It clearly. polish has worn off the nail. Enamel worn off the teeth.

    Tyre has worn out, no longer can be used. Thread has worn off the tyre.
     
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