weaving a path through the preparations

thetazuo

Senior Member
Chinese - China
WATERLOO, Belgium — The region around this Belgian city is busily preparing to commemorate the 200th anniversary in 2015 of one of the major battles in European military history. But weaving a path through the preparations is proving almost as tricky as making one’s way across the battlefield was back then, when the Duke of Wellington, as commander of an international alliance of forces, crushed Napoleon.
200 Years After Battle, Some Hard Feelings Remain
Hi. Does the bold part mean “making preparations”?
Thank you.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is difficult to say (even after reading the article). "Understanding what all the preparations are" is the closest I can come to working it out, but I am not at all confident this is what the writer meant. It seems to me like the writer came up with the metaphor and then tried to think of some way of fitting it into his article.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    It is difficult to say (even after reading the article).
    :thumbsup:


    As I understand it:
    But weaving a path through the preparations - Although creating an administrative system that links all the events that are being prepared and in an order that makes some sense...
     

    burningpocket

    Member
    English - United States
    It just means making the preparations. The significance of “weaving a path” here is just that it invokes traveling in the same sort of way that “navigating the battlefield” does. That’s why the author used it for the metaphor.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I read it as saying that it's hard to go anywhere in the area without running into and/or dealing with preparations - buildings under construction, etc.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    He seems to mean that making your way through the city, with everyone involved in preparing for the anniversary celebrations, is as difficult as making your way through the battlefield in 1815 would have been.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It seems to me like the writer came up with the metaphor and then tried to think of some way of fitting it into his article.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:o_O

    To the extent that it means something, I would say it's a reference to the difficulties in convincing certain factions to participate. No, it doesn't exactly match the words, but see Uncle Jack's quote above.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I agree with Barque and Myridon. It seems a forced comparison, and it's rather flippant to compare the material preparations for the anniversary to what must have been a confusion of dead and dying horses and men on the actual battlefield.
     
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