Wedding ceremony / marriage ceremony

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Lun-14

Banned
Hindi
Hi,

Do attend the wedding ceremony or marriage ceremony?
I think saying "wedding ceremony" is wrong because wedding is itself a ceremony, so that would be redundant to use ceremony after wedding.
I think we could use only "marriage ceremony" or simply "wedding", e.g:

We are going to attend a wedding (just wedding, not wedding ceremony)/marriage ceremony tonight.

Do you agree with me?

Thanking you all.:)
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I agree, but I don't think I would use the verb "attend". When you go to "a wedding", you are usually invited to the ceremony and to the reception, if there is one. (There will be cultural differences. Some families only invite close friends and relations to the reception.)

    B: Where are you going this evening?
    A: We're going to a wedding. We'll be back soon.
    B: Aren't you invited to the reception as well?
    A: No, we've only been invited to the wedding ceremony:(.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Hi, veli,
    "marriage ceremony" also doesn't seem right to me because marriage is a long term relationship between two individuals--life partners, it is not a ceremony at all. So I guess when we want to refer to the ceremony, only wedding is correct.
    What do you think?
     
    Last edited:

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I'd go along with veli on this. Yes, the marriage is the relationship. The wedding is the celebration. If you need to distinguish between the different parts of the celebration (the dance, the party, the meal/reception, the speeches, the church service, the exchange of vows), I might imagine someone saying wedding ceremony (the church service or the part where the vows are exchanged).
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Hi, natraitip.
    Thanks for replying.
    I think saying "wedding ceremony" will still be odd if someone uses it for a part of celebration, e.g, the church service. Why not say "the ceremony of the church service" or "the celebration of the church service"?:confused:
    I think one should just say "wedding", not "wedding ceremony" because it is tautologous.

    And i think saying "marriage ceremony" is also not right, i don't know why.:confused:

    Can you shed some light on this? thank you!
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    As I said, 'wedding ceremony' isn't tautologous if you think of the wedding consisting of different components. If somebody said they were attending a ceremony, it isn't clear whether they are just going for the reception or going to the solemnisation (assuming they are held at separate venues). For me, the solemnisation bit constitutes the ceremony.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    In another thread, I have been told that "When is your sister's wedding?" is most commonly used. When I see the usual meanings of the words "marriage" and "wedding", I see that it is the word "wedding" that makes sense here, because it is the ceremony and ceremonies held/take place. "Marriage" doesn't make sense here - it can't take place, because it is the relationship - a long term sharing of two lives. Relationships don't take place; it is the ceremonies that take place.
    Or we can say:
    Wedding is a ceremony that unites two people in a relationship of marriage.


    But when I saw the definition#3 of "marriage" in the WR dictionary, I got confused. In this meaning, "marriage" (like "wedding") is being referred to as a 'ceremony'. So "marriage" is a ceremony. "Wedding" is also a ceremony.

    My question is: when is "marriage" used as meaning a "ceremony" and when is it used as meaning a "relationship"? How to differentiate between marriage as a ceremony and marriage as a relationship?


    Thanks a lot!
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The marriage ceremony is a very public way of saying that the two people involved have a change in status. The wedding encompasses both the ceremony and the subsequent celebration.

    The ceremony is performed by member of the clergy, a ship's captain or a Justice of the Peace (civil employee).
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    The usual meaning of "wedding" is a ceremony. The usual meaning of "marriage" is a relationship. But "marriage" also means a ceremony (as the WR dictionary indicates). I just want to know when "marriage" is used as meaning a ceremony.

    Could someone please help on this?
    Thanks.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In something like 'THE bride's father, the Rev. Phil Dew, officiated at the marriage of Peter Richard King and Emma Dew at Tebay Methodist Church.'

    Other similar sentences I found had "marriage ceremony" or "marriage service".

    But I'd say all the guests would say they went to Richard and Emma' wedding. I would be surprised if any of them would say that they went to their marriage.

    I agree. I was a wedding photographer for many years, not a "marriage photographer", (though I would shoot images of the ceremony).

    The "wedding" is a more inclusive term.

    There are wedding planners who organize the entire affair, contracting for the ceremony, the rental of a venue, the flowers, the food, the drink, etc. Running a large wedding is not much less complicated than planning a regiment for battle (and can have similar results:D).
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    I agree. I was a wedding photographer for many years, not a "marriage photographer", (though I would shoot images of the ceremony).

    The "wedding" is a more inclusive term.

    There are wedding planners who organize the entire affair, contracting for the ceremony, the rental of a venue, the flowers, the food, the drink, etc. Running a large wedding is not much less complicated than planning a regiment for battle (and can have similar results:D).
    I'm still confused...
    Could you please have a look at def. 3 of "marriage" in the WR dictionary? The normal meaning of "marriage" is a relationship. But why does this dictionary entry regard this as a ceremony?:rolleyes::confused:
    When is "marriage" a ceremony and when is "marriage" a relationship?
    I'd be very grateful if you could clear this up for me.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I'm still confused...
    Could you please have a look at def. 3 of "marriage" in the WR dictionary? The normal meaning of "marriage" is a relationship. But why does this dictionary entry regard this as a ceremony?:rolleyes::confused:
    When is "marriage" a ceremony and when is "marriage" a relationship?
    I'd be very grateful if you could clear this up for me.

    A marriage is always a relationship.

    At the commencement of a marriage there is a marriage ceremony whose purpose is to announce the change in status for the two being married.

    A marriage ceremony and a big party are merged to create a "wedding".
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The verbs wed and marry are synonymous — but wed is much less commonly used than marry. Wed + direct object (wed someone) is old-fashioned or possibly regional usage. It’s much more common to say marry or get married to someone. Also rare, therefore, is the use of wedding as a present participle equivalent to marrying or getting married.

    As a noun, a wedding is the whole occasion/event around and including the marriage ceremony. The ceremony itself, whether civil or religious, can be called either the wedding ceremony or the marriage ceremony.

    After the wedding, the marriage continues as a (supposedly) lifelong union.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    [[ Moderator Note. Today's thread is going over the same topic asked some time ago by the same questioner. It is also going over the same topic that had already been thoroughly discussed before the first instance by this questioner. Today's thread has therefore been closed. ]]
     
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