weed

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Reliure

Senior Member
Hi, I took this from the trailer of a Danish film that I haven't seen.
According to the title "The Green Butchers" it must be quite airy-fairy.

A young man and a young lady have just come into his place.
Looking for something to drink to offer, he says (obviously embarrassed)

"I haven't got tea. But I have plenty of weed. Will that do?
_With milk and sugar!"

At first I thought weed was a sort of meat-juice, but according to what she answers (even aware that tastes diverge by countries) I found in the dictionary it was unwanted plants in the garden.

Is weed an argotic term to mean a sort of insipid herbal tea?
Is this guy crazy enough to drink herbal tea he creates himself,
Or would he propose her light drug to smoke, and a misanderstanding take place?
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    If both lines are spoken by the young man:
    "weed" is a common slang word for marijuana in AmE, as you apparently know, and he seems to be proposing to make tea of it.
    If the second line is spoken by the woman:
    The first line could be an offer of marijuana to smoke, and the second might her enthusiastic acceptance. This is a very tentative proposal, based on the fact that "with sugar and cream!" can be an enthusiastic "Yes, please" for an offer of anything in general. However, I am not certain I have ever heard "with milk and sugar" used this way.​
     
    Last edited:

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    He's referring to marijuana. Her response indicates that she would love some weed. Her response might sound odd but it indicates that if it were tea, she'd be going all the way with gusto (with milk and sugar). "With milk and sugar" shows her enthusiasm.

    Edit: I see that Cagey and I are on the same wavelength with regard to her response.
     

    Reliure

    Senior Member
    Thanks a lot (to?) both of you
    ( feel free to correct my formulation ; my school notions are getting old)

    I 've watched the trailer once more and it seems you're right for the first character since in another sample scene he says to a collegue :
    "I smoke 20 joints a day. I wouldn't smell it if my hair was on fire" ( I guess there's hidden meaning in tha sentence that I'm missing , but let's get back to the point...)

    On the contrary the girl seems so innocent that I think finally there is a misanderstanding, however the sense she gives to "with milk and sugar".

    But that, I 'll only know it if I find the DVD with french subtitles (and cheap!), those that I doubt since the moovie wasn't played in french cinemas...
    Suspense, suspense...

    I ask a question about With milk & sugar, expression that I didn't know,in the English/French forum if you agree to give me another precision...
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    On the contrary the girl seems so innocent that I think finally there is a misanderstanding, however the sense she gives to "with milk and sugar".
    If there is further context that would support your conclusion, then so be it. I just find it hard to believe that, in this day and age, any young lady wouldn't understand what he was offering her.;)
     

    Reliure

    Senior Member
    Well, I can swear you a (young?) lady like me wouldn't have got he was dealing with herb, all the more that when he makes his proposition he stands in front of the kitchen sink and a cupboard full of dishes!
    But I admit I'm not the most modern girl, ah, ah,ah!!!
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    The first post says that this was the trailer for a Danish film. Was it dubbed into English or were there English subtitles? I wonder if "milk and sugar" was an attempt to render the "sugar and cream" idiom, an attempt that went slightly wide of the mark. That would make the reply (if it is the girl replying) both enthusiastic agreement and a little joke.

    If the weed in question is marijuana, it might also be worth noting that a very, very long time ago it was called "tea". That is probably not directly relevant to this scene, though.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Now I have seen the trailer in question.

    I think you correct: he is offering her marijuana, and she thinks he is offering her tea. As this is a translation from Danish, it is possible that in Danish the same word means marijuana and tea, as it used to in the US, but the English translation has lost the play on words that makes sense of her answer.
     

    Reliure

    Senior Member
    Thanks, Nunty
    I definitely have to see that moovie ; it'll give me all the knowledge I haven't about drugs!
    ... and Danish humor as well, because as you guessed the trailer was in Danish dubbed into English.

    To clarify the first post : yes, it's the girl who answers :" With milk and sugar!"
    I noticed that there were stems near a counter but they didn’t draw particularly my attention as long as this story takes place in the countryside...
    (But I could’t say if it’s marijuana or not, I’ve never seen some!!)

    About "sugar and cream" or « milk and sugar " I would have missed that as well, since tea and coffee are currently drunk without any of that in France.
    (That makes me laught all alone reminding me of the day I offered 5 coffees I had prepared for Londonians friends, a few years ago)

    Thanks all of you for all these precisions, it's a real delight to learn that much about such a variety of cultures in addition to the meaning of a simple word.
     
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