weedy niceness

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rupertbrooke

Senior Member
English UK
This comes from an article about a radio programme, in which a Christian bishop, Nick Baines, the Bishop of Leeds said he did not like the recent demonstrations in Germany against the Islamisation of the West. Some marchers had made “irrational” comments, he said. The bishop offered us a choice: “Be driven by fear and insecurity into suspicion and hatred of the other, or take the risk of dancing to a different tune. The author of the article said he felt irritated. "I have no desire to hate “the other” and I deplore all religious leaders who do so – numerous ayatollahs and imams, for example, who insult Jews, homosexuals, bare-headed women etc from the pulpit. I would, in principle, prefer to take the risk of dancing to Bishop Nick’s tune round the streets of Leeds in one of those displays of weedy niceness which are a precious part of our Anglican heritage. But he made me cross, because he was not being honest.'
For the full article, read http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/11335866/There-is-a...
The Anglican Church/Church of England is renowned for being 'nice' i.e. ready to accommodate all views and be all things to all men ( herkesin aradığı/peşinde koştuğu) & 'weedy' (? güçsüz). So 'weedy niceness' means a kind of spinelessness which smiles feebly at everyone & wouldn't harm a fly (çok yumuşak) or mülayim. The Anglican Church has priests who feel more at home drinking tea with old ladies than doing anything remotely likely to hurt anyone. It's difficult to explain but that's my nearest definition.
What would the Turkish be for the above phrase?
 
  • shafaq

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    This comes from an article about a radio programme, in which a Christian bishop, Nick Baines, the Bishop of Leeds said he did not like the recent demonstrations in Germany against the Islamisation of the West. Some marchers had made “irrational” comments, he said. The bishop offered us a choice: “Be driven by fear and insecurity into suspicion and hatred of the other, or take the risk of dancing to a different tune. The author of the article said he felt irritated. "I have no desire to hate “the other” and I deplore all religious leaders who do so – numerous ayatollahs and imams, for example, who insult Jews, homosexuals, bare-headed women etc from the pulpit. I would, in principle, prefer to take the risk of dancing to Bishop Nick’s tune round the streets of Leeds in one of those displays of weedy niceness which are a precious part of our Anglican heritage. But he made me cross, because he was not being honest.'
    For the full article, read http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/11335866/There-is-a...
    The Anglican Church/Church of England is renowned for being 'nice' i.e. ready to accommodate all views and be all things to all men ( herkesin aradığı/peşinde koştuğu) & 'weedy' (? güçsüz). So 'weedy niceness' means a kind of spinelessness which smiles feebly at everyone & wouldn't harm a fly (çok yumuşak) or mülayim. The Anglican Church has priests who feel more at home drinking tea with old ladies than doing anything remotely likely to hurt anyone. It's difficult to explain but that's my nearest definition.
    What would the Turkish be for the above phrase?
    I don't think "weedy" means "güçsüz" here.
    As far as I got; it means "full of weeds(=wild plants)" which figuratively stands for "full of (previously) inhaled and tolerated foreign entities"; which is ready to accept and tolerate more.
    If this is the case; I may render the "weedy niceness" into Turkish as "herkese açık cennet"; which literally means " a paradise where accepts anyone without exception".
     

    rupertbrooke

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thanks, shafaq, for your suggestion. How would you then translate the whole phrase 'one of those displays of weedy niceness which are a precious part of our Anglican heritage.' 'Weedy' figuratively means 'iradesi zayıf/işe yaramaz'.
     
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    shafaq

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Thanks, shafaq, for your suggestion. How would you then translate the whole phrase 'one of those displays of weedy niceness which are a precious part of our Anglican heritage.'
    Frankly; I can't say that I have precisely got the sense of whole sentence; while "herkese açık cennet" was a hesitant attempt.

    Anyway; here is my attempt:
    "...Anglikan mirasımızın değerli bir parçası olagelen "weedy niceness" davranışlarından/gösterilerinden biri..."
    In my approach; "weedy niceness" here may be rendered as "öteki'ni/yabancı olanı kucaklayan".

    'Weedy' figuratively means 'iradesi zayıf/işe yaramaz'.
    I wonder if; "weedy niceness" has negative connotation; how does it can be "a precious part of ones' Anglican heritage"?

    Again; I suspect that I have got the sense of that sentence precisely.
     

    rupertbrooke

    Senior Member
    English UK
    'Weedy niceness' is a precious part of our Anglican inheritance because no Anglican clergyman/woman would want to harm anyone, whatever they have done. This is precious in these days of extreme and brutal nastiness. But it is weedy since it doesn't seem for stand for anything & tolerates everyone, even paedophiles and racists, even though it would condemn their behaviour. There is a common statement that 'Anglicans hate the sin but not the sinner'. Anglicans would never condemn gays or lesbians, let alone stone them to death. They would never kill anyone whatever cause they espouse.
     
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