Ween

< Previous | Next >

Włoskipolak 72

Member
Polish
Hello Everybody !

I'm a new member ,I like archaic verbs , words.., well I hope I can count on you !?

ween : to think or imagine (something) !

Word origin
Old English wēnan; related to Old Saxon wānian, Gothic wēnjan, German wähnen to assume wrongly.

ween: mniemać in polish.

Please let me know the translation in your language ! :oops:
 
  • Włoskipolak 72

    Member
    Polish
    I have found more information ; :oops:

    " be of the opinion, have the notion" (archaic), Old English wēnan "to fancy, imagine, believe; expect, hope," Old Norse væna, Old Frisian wena, Gothic wēnjan "to expect, suppose, think"), from *woeniz "expectation," from PIE root *wen- (1) "to desire, strive for." Archaic since 17c.
     
    Welcome!
    The Greek v. -which is considered an archaism too- is «φρονώ» [frɔˈnɔ] < Classical denominative v. «φρονέω/φρονῶ» pʰrŏnéō (uncontracted)/pʰrŏnô (contracted) --> to be minded, think, be wise < Classical 3rd declension feminine noun «φρήν» pʰrḗn (nominative sing.), «φρενός» pʰrĕnós (genitive sing.) --> midriff, diaphragm, also as the seat of mental activity, sense, soul, spirit, mind, wits, heart (PIE *gʷʰren- (Pokorny), *bʰrēn-/*bʰren- (Beekes); its sole cognate is the Proto-Germanic *gruniz > ONorse grunr, doubt, uncertainty, suspicion).
     

    Włoskipolak 72

    Member
    Polish
    Welcome!
    The Greek v. -which is considered an archaism too- is «φρονώ» [frɔˈnɔ] < Classical denominative v. «φρονέω/φρονῶ» pʰrŏnéō (uncontracted)/pʰrŏnô (contracted) --> to be minded, think, be wise < Classical 3rd declension feminine noun «φρήν» pʰrḗn (nominative sing.), «φρενός» pʰrĕnós (genitive sing.) --> midriff, diaphragm, also as the seat of mental activity, sense, soul, spirit, mind, wits, heart (PIE *gʷʰren- (Pokorny), *bʰrēn-/*bʰren- (Beekes); its sole cognate is the Proto-Germanic *gruniz > ONorse grunr, doubt, uncertainty, suspicion).
    ευχαριστώ for your replay .., I wish I could speak greek ! :rolleyes:
    And what about νομίζω ?

    Greek is the richest language in the world with 5 million words and 70 million word types. In comparison, English has only 490,000 words.
    Is it true...... !?

    ween: mniemać [ˈmʲɲɛ̃maʨ̑], in polish ( przypuszczać coś, wnioskować )
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Good evening and welcome to the forum, I hope you will participate a lot here we miss Polish members here a lot. :)
    Interesting, mostly because it looks like a coincidence, there is a formal Hungarian verb for think and it is vél. The origin is obscure.
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    In literary Portuguese the word cuidar, from Latin cogitare, means to think, to ponder, to consider. Its usual meaning, though, is to take care of something or someone, to look after, to mind.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    If we are looking for an archaic verb, I guess maginar would be the one in Spanish.
    In literary Portuguese the word cuidar, from Latin cogitare, means to think, to ponder, to consider. Its usual meaning, though, is to take care of something or someone, to look after, to mind.
    In Spanish too.
     

    Włoskipolak 72

    Member
    Polish
    Good evening and welcome to the forum, I hope you will participate a lot here we miss Polish members here a lot. :)
    Interesting, mostly because it looks like a coincidence, there is a formal Hungarian verb for think and it is vél. The origin is obscure.
    Hi , Jó reggelt kívánok ? :oops:
    Thanks , is it archaic vél , do you use it frequently ?

    Finally I have found the origin of polish verb mniemać from protoslavic (psł. *mьnĕti), mnieć in old polish XIV c. ( przypuszczać, sądzić, uważać, być zdania ) suppose, believe, consider, have an opinion.

    https://repozytorium.amu.edu.pl/bitstream/10593/2022/1/Knapik.pdf
     

    Włoskipolak 72

    Member
    Polish
    In literary Portuguese the word cuidar, from Latin cogitare, means to think, to ponder, to consider. Its usual meaning, though, is to take care of something or someone, to look after, to mind.
    If we are looking for an archaic verb, I guess maginar would be the one in Spanish.

    In Spanish too.
    In italian it is the same from Latin cogitare (agitare dentro di sé, nella propria mente) , (stir within oneself, in one's mind) pensare , meditare , ponderare , riflettere , ( to think , meditate , mull over , ponder , reflect) :oops:
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    No, it's not the same, because cogitare in Italian can't be used as to take care of someone or something.
     

    Włoskipolak 72

    Member
    Polish
    No, it's not the same, because cogitare in Italian can't be used as to take care of someone or something.
    I ment from Latin cogitare , in italian (agitare dentro di sé, nella propria mente ) meditare , ponderare , riflettere.
    I don't know the portugese language and the meaning of cuidar. :rolleyes:
    But in spanish cogitar (reflexionar o meditar algo ) , pensar , cavilar , meditar , contemplar.
     
    Last edited:

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I see there has been no reply from West Germanic languages. So as for Dutch (but I'll be sjhort now, add something later):
    - wanen = to think of something as real, to imagine it real, but mistaken, (someone waant zich (reflexive) Napoleon, I waan mij in heaven), which is semantically pejorative as such, but as some kind of infantile thinking or mentally challenged or ...)
    - derivations: waanzin - nonsense, "wrong-thought sense", madness, frenzy, but...
    - verwaand: conceited, pejorative form of the V

    Wahnsinn (N) in German, wähnen (V), or so I believe!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top