Weep

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  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Welcome to WRF, Vanessa!

    This word can mean more than one thing. For example, saying that a person weeps has a different meaning than saying that a concrete wall weeps. What context did you have in mind?

    (You might also tell us if there is anything specific about a dictionary definition that you don't understand.)
     

    vanessa melo

    New Member
    Português
    Welcome to WRF, Vanessa!

    This word can mean more than one thing. For example, saying that a person weeps has a different meaning than saying that a concrete wall weeps. What context did you have in mind?

    (You might also tell us if there is anything specific about a dictionary definition that you don't understand.)
    I've found in a dictionary the weep has a meaning about crying.
    E.g: The bride's mother weep a lot.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Basically "weep" and "cry" mean the same thing. Weeping is quiet crying. So quiet crying can be called either word.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The everyday verb is "cry". "Weep" is used less often, and can have a literary or slightly old-fashioned flavour - in BE at least.

    I think that in silly romantic novels women tend to "weep". It doesn't necessarily mean "shed silent tears", but it often does.

    The mother of the bride "wept" (shed tears of emotion). That's something I read rather than hear people saying. I might say that I "cry" at weddings and in the cinema sometimes. "Weep" isn't in my active vocabulary.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Just for the record, "weep" is a verb that derives from Old English while "cry" is borrowed from French (albeit centuries ago). Typically in such situations, with a Germanic and a Latinate synonym, the Latinate word wins out in overall usage ... unless you're listening to Country Western music. :D

    edit: You might also say that while "weep" often crops up in more poetic contexts it also is something more anguished than "cry".
     
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