weighing in at 7 lb 13 oz

HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
Hi, what is this 'in' doing here? The phrase would stand without it, or even 'in' and 'at' altogether, wouldn't it?

On the day of the birth, she settled in between the hospital's crisp white sheets and prepared for a rerun of the first long haul. But it was not to be. She barely had time to take notice of her surroundings before she was wheeled to the delivery room. Within an hour, Morag had effortlessly and painlessly arrived, weighing in at 7 lb 13 oz.
('Mummy, Take Me Home' by David Leslie)
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I can't tell you exactly why people use "weighing in at ___", Hiro, but that expression is fairly common. It's especially common when people want to express the idea that the subject was weighed by some other person who recorded that weight in some sort of official record. For this reason, you'll often find the phrase being used when people are weighing babies, boxers, wrestlers, fish, and game animals. :)
     
    Last edited:

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Hi, owlman.

    Generally, you would also say 'something weighs xxx lb xxx oz' or 'weighs at xxx lb xxx oz,' wouldn't you?

    Hiro
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    If I wasn't using "weighing in at __", Hiro, I'd use "weighs" without "at". "At" seems a little strange to me outside that one particular phrase.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    HSS, you need to think of weigh in as a phrasal verb. Here is the definition in the Collins Dictionary:
    weigh in
    vb (intr, adverb)
    • (of a boxer or wrestler) to be weighed before a bout
    • (of a jockey) to be weighed after, or sometimes before, a race
    • informal to contribute, as in a discussion, etc: he weighed in with a few sharp comments
    The relevant definitions are the first two. You weigh in when you officially take your weight. You also have the noun weigh-in (eg the boxer went for his weigh-in). When we talk about babies, this is an extension of this use. The preposition is necessary for weigh in if you indicate the weight:

    • I weighed 10 stone
    • I weighed in at 10 stone

    There's also another thread that you might find interesting:

    weigh in
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    HSS, you need to think of weigh in as a phrasal verb. Here is the definition in the Collins Dictionary:

    The relevant definitions are the first two. You weigh in when you officially take your weight. You also have the noun weigh-in (eg the boxer went for his weigh-in). When we talk about babies, this is an extension of this use. The preposition is necessary for weigh in if you indicate the weight:

    • I weighed 10 stone
    • I weighed in at 10 stone

    There's also another thread that you might find interesting:

    weigh in
    Hello, Nat.

    Yes, I have been very familiar with the last entry as being 'informal to contribute, as in a discussion, etc: he weighed in with a few sharp comments' But the first two, along with what Owlman pointed to, have been new to me.

    Thanks,

    Hiro
     
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