Welcome aboard, me hearties!

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi
Here is a dialogue from a cartoon series called Peppa Pig (here )
background:Granny Pig and Grandpa Pig are taking Peppa and George out for a day on the river.
daddy:Welcome aboard, me hearties!
son:peppa, George, let's put your life-jackets on.
Please notice the words in red. I feel it should be my hearties, rather than me hearties. Am I right?

Thank you in advance
 
  • OED Loves Me Not

    Senior Member
    Japanese - Osaka
    For some time I've been into British and Irish novels
    and movies. There I've found lots of people speaking
    dialects. Many of them actually say "me" instead of "my."
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Not if you're a pirate! Pirates always use a dialect that says 'me' for 'my'.
    Oh, thank you. But neither of the two grandpas is a pivate in the cartoon.
    For some time I've been into British and Irish novels
    and movies. There I've found lots of people speaking
    dialects. Many of them actually say "me" instead of "my."
    Maybe here it is also a dialet.
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    He is adopting a pirate dialect for fun because they are on a boat. It's a joke.

    OED Loves Me Not : You are correct - what we refer to here as a "pirate dialect" is basically a form of the dialect used in South West England, which has this feature. It is also found in other regional dialects.
     

    Delvo

    Senior Member
    American English
    The noun "hearty/hearties" is also from "pirate English". I've never heard it from anyone but TV/movie pirates.

    The idea of pirates talking the way they're shown in movies & TV dates back mostly to Robert Newton's portrayal of Long John Silver in Disney's "Treasure Island" in 1950. His natural accent was "West Country" English, which he deliberately exaggerated during filming to stand out more from the other characters. That part of England was important to British shipping in the movie's historical era, so it does stand to reason that a disproportionate number of British sailors at the time would have been from there and spoken with an accent like the natural one he was exaggerating.
     
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