welcome-adjective and verb

Bhikkhu1991

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello,


Sentence A. I would like to welcome your proposal.

Sentence B. Your proposal is welcome by me.

Sentence C. You are welcome to join us. Welcome is an adjective. ( WordNet)


Could you please explain how to use 'welcome' in adjective and in verb?

I am sorry that I still do not understand the differences among the above sentences.

I hope to hear from you soon.

Thank you.


With best wishes.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hello,


    Sentence A. I would like to welcome your proposal.

    Sentence B. Your proposal is welcome by me.

    Sentence C. You are welcome to join us. Welcome is an adjective. ( WordNet)


    Could you please explain how to use 'welcome' in adjective and in verb?

    I am sorry that I still do not understand the differences among the above sentences.

    I hope to hear from you soon.

    Thank you.


    With best wishes.
    Firstly, your sentences are a little odd-sounding, Bhikkhu. "I would like to welcome your proposal" implies incompleteness ie "I would like to welcome your proposal but I can't" or "I would like to welcome your proposal but it's not good enough". Let's simplify it and say:

    "I welcome your proposal". Welcome here is used as a verb.

    Your second sentence should be "Your proposal is welcomed by me". In this case, "welcomed" is also a verb.

    In your sentence "You are welcome to join us", "welcome" is an adjective.

    You haven't said what you are confused about...
     

    Bhikkhu1991

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hello Dimcl,


    I greatly appreciate your response. I would like to tell you that I am confused when to use the adjective 'welcome' and when to use the verb 'welcome'. Another confusion is "I would like to welcome your proposal" which is considered incompleteness by you. Do you mean that 'I welcome your proposal' is acceptable without 'would like'? Please elaborate.

    I hope to hear from you.

    Thank you.


    With best wishes.
     

    marcin k

    Senior Member
    Poland, polish
    If you say 'I welcome your proposal' it means 'I accept it and approve of it.' - and that is THE FACT, so someone you're talking to knows that they've got your approval.

    However, if you say 'I'd like to welcome... ' it means that you DO NOT welcome it yet, you only have a wish to do so. Saying 'I would like to...' does not tell anyone what is already TRUE but only what you WANT to be true, so I would know then that my proposal isn't in fact WELCOME just yet, right now you only have a wish to do it. It's the same as actually GIVING someone something in one case and telling them you WISH to give them something, which does not automatically mean that they have it already.

    I suppose that you wanted to say 'I'd like to welcome your proposal' to sound polite and kind, as introducing certain phrases in different languages softens the tone, but in this particular case you would leave someone wondering when you actually going to do what you say you would like to...
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I agree with marcin k there, in regard to the "proposal" sentence. I think the speaker has borrowed the "I would like" from "I would like to welcome you all [...]" where "I would like to" means, really "It is my pleasure to...". This is something of a set phrase and idiom, but with "proposal" it doesn't work in the same way. Idioms are often not transferable.

    You can usually spot welcome as an adjective in these ways:
    It appears before a noun (attributive adjective):
    "The fine weather is a welcome relief from all that rain."

    It appears after a noun or pronoun followed by "to be" (and similar verbs, like "seemed") (predicative adjective):
    "You are welcome!"

    Often welcome has an indirect object, such as a verb phrase:
    "Oscar was welcome to come and go as he liked."
    Or a noun or noun phrase:
    "You are welcome to some of this cake."

    As a verb it follows a subject and takes an object, or otherwise behaves like a normal transitive verb.
     
    Last edited:

    Bhikkhu1991

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hello Matching Mole and marcin k,


    I greatly appreciate your clarifications, that is, in Matching Mole's reply and in the following marcin k's. At least, I have a general idea how the word 'welcome' works adjectively and verbly now although I have not mastered them yet.


    If you say 'I welcome your proposal' it means 'I accept it and approve of it.' - and that is THE FACT, so someone you're talking to knows that they've got your approval.
    Thank you.


    With best wishes.
     
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