Welcome/d

blue bird

Member
Spanish
Please,
When I use the word 'welcome' as adjective, should I use it in as a verb in past tense:

"He will make you feel very welcome/d and relax/ed"
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You could also use "welcome" in your first version. In fact, this would be more common: He will make you feel very welcome. This is a special case where "welcome" has dropped the "d" at the end. It is now an ordinary adjective that works without the "-ed" ending of past participles.

    "Relaxed" should definitely be a past participle functioning as an adjective. Many other adjectives work that way: cherished, adored, admired, satisfied etc.
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You could also use "welcome" in your first version. In fact, this would be more common: He will make you feel very welcome. This is a special case where "welcome" has dropped the "d" at the end. It is now an ordinary adjective that works without the "-ed" ending of past participles.
    Is it? I ask because welcome seems like simple modifier for feel, much like comfortable or at home. He will make you feel comfortable. He will make you feel at home. He will make you feel welcome.

    I do understand, however, than welcomed can be used.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I do believe it is, Mr. Copyright. Here's M-W's etymology for the word: Etymology: Middle English, alteration (influenced by wel well) of wilcume desirable guest, from Old English wilcuma

    If I understand this correctly, then wilcuma would have been the Old English equivalent for the German willkommen, which is a past participle in that language. It is merely saying "you are well come" with the meaning "You did well to come here. I am happy that you did". The "come" here would be an irregular past participle. Now technically "welcome" probably never was used much with the "-ed" as the regular past participle of "to welcome". I think it remained in the language after dropping the old ending "a" that it had in Old English.

    If this is true then "welcome" existed on its own as a shortened way to say "well come", and so the past participle of the transitive "to welcome" has never really had a chance to flourish.
     
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    Ihsiin

    Senior Member
    English
    "Welcome" is, as it appears, the pairing of "well" and "come", (compare with romance equivalents, e.g. Italian "benvenuto" from "bene" (well) and "venuto" (come)). Similarly, in some archaic contexts, the phrase "well-met" is used.

    Anyway, in this regard, the "come" part is the past participle of "to come", and so further past participling is superfluous. Thus, in the original phrase of this thread, only "He will make you feel very welcome and relaxed" is correct.

    The word "welcomed" should only be used in explicit regard to the act of welcoming. The phrases "I felt welcome" and "I felt welcomed" have somewhat different meanings. The first implies that I felt comfortable or happy in coming, often in regard to people to whom I've come, but with no necessity of action on their part. The latter implies that my hosts had actually undertaken to welcome me.

    Now, I'm aware that the phrase in question implies some proactive welcoming on the part of 'him', but to say "He will make you feel welcomed" is a very clumsy way of putting it. It'd be more natural to say "He will welcome you", but I feel that that's not what the phrase is getting at. It seems to me that "welcome" in the context of this phrase is talking about a feeling of 'coming well' on the part of 'you', rather then a sense of welcoming on the part of 'him'.

    This post may seem a bit sloppily written. I'm sorry.
     
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    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I think Ihsiin is right to note a distinction between the two. "Welcome" certainly can't take the adverbs "warmly" or "coolly" as "welcomed" can: He was warmly/coolly welcomed at the party.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I do believe it is, Mr. Copyright. Here's M-W's etymology for the word: Etymology: Middle English, alteration (influenced by wel well) of wilcume desirable guest, from Old English wilcuma
    Thank you for all the additional information... I just go by feel. :)
     
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