welcome in my/our

almostgal

Senior Member
Hi all,

I would like to know how you say to a pal, international friend, when you want to welcome s/he in your country? I have made these two sentences, so which is best?

1. Welcome in my country

2. Welcome in our country

Thanks you in advance.
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The phrase is 'Welcome to ... !' and doesn't change. There is often no logic to usage especially prepositions.
    Welcome to England!/ Welcome to London!/ Welcome to my house!/ Welcome to my birthday party!.

    'Welcome to my country!' sounds strange to me too, very much what non-native speakers say. I'd say 'Welcome to (name of country)'.
     

    almostgal

    Senior Member
    The phrase is 'Welcome to ... !' and doesn't change. There is often no logic to usage especially prepositions.
    Welcome to England!/ Welcome to London!/ Welcome to my house!/ Welcome to my birthday party!.

    'Welcome to my country!' sounds strange to me too, very much what non-native speakers say. I'd say 'Welcome to (name of country)'.


    Thank you. You're welcome to Tanzania.
     

    xuliang

    Senior Member
    Chinese Mandarin
    Hi, I was taught that "welcome to ..." is usually said when the listener is already in the place physically. Is it? For example, when someone, an online girl friend, told me that he was coming to China the next week, what should I respond? I also want to include the meaning of "welcome" her.

    The girl friend: I am going to China next week. (She will be on her business trip, maybe the first time to China.)
    I: Really, welcome to China. (I am Chinese and staying in China. )

    I don't think "welcome to China" is proper here. I would like to know what I should say here to "welcome" her. Thank you.
     
    Last edited:

    jmichaelm

    Senior Member
    English - US
    ...If I say "to my country", I feel like I own it, is not it?
    You also use "my" to indicate your relationship to something or someone. "I want you to meet my father." does not imply I own my father. "This is my church." means it is the church I attend, not one I own.
     
    Last edited:

    jmichaelm

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The girl friend: I am going to China next week. (She will be on her business trip, maybe the first time to China.)
    I: Really, welcome to China. (I am Chinese and staying in China. )

    I don't think "welcome to China" is proper here.
    I would say "welcome to..." when someone arrives. If someone tells me they will come in the future, I might say, "I'm looking forward to your visit."
     

    xuliang

    Senior Member
    Chinese Mandarin
    I would say "welcome to..." when someone arrives. If someone tells me they will come in the future, I might say, "I'm looking forward to your visit."
    Hi, Jmichaelm, thank you. Can I say this when my friend will not see me during her visit to China? Thank you.
    "I'm looking forward to your visit."
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Hi, Anti_virus_abdo, welcome to WRF

    Let's say that you live in Tunisia and someone on this forum writes to you and the conversation goes like this:

    A: "Hi Anti_virus_abdo, I am travelling to Tunisia next month. I have never been before, have you any tips for me?"
    B: "That's great news, I am in Tunis, we must meet."
    A: "Tunis? I will be Delhiba, 700Km to the south, and I will have no transport.
    B: "Oh, that's a pity - nevertheless, welcome to Tunisia in advance. I'm sure you'll have a great time. And now my tips: ..."
     

    Phil-Olly

    Senior Member
    Scotland, English
    Just while we're on this subject, is anyone else irritated by the airline staff issuing a "welcome to ...." just as the plane lands?

    Surely it is up to the ground staff to welcome the passengers, staff, and anyone else; but it always seems odd to me for someone to issue a welcome to you when they've travelled all the way there with you.

    An exception might be if your friend John picks you up at the airport, drives to you his house and then says to you "welcome to my home!"
    However it would be strange, wouldn't it, if a taxi driver, performing the same service, said "Welcome to John's home!"
     
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