Welcome in/to

nemosnemos

Senior Member
Italian Italy
"Welcome in" or "Welcome to"?
Yesterday I saw a big poster at the airport with this phrase "Welcome in Puglia". Shouldn't the right translation be "Welcome to Puglia"?
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    As a greeting, it should be "wecome to".

    "Welcome to Castle Dracula, Mr. Stoker", said the Count.

    However, there are contexts where "in" would be correct. For example:

    While my girlfriends parents are always polite, I never feel truly welcome in their house.

    While the people of Paris were cold and unfriendly, the travellers received a very warm welcome in London and Rome.
     

    padredeocho

    Banned
    United States
    "Welcome in" or "Welcome to"?
    Yesterday I saw a big poster at the airport with this phrase: "Welcome in Puglia". Shouldn't the right translation be "Welcome to Puglia"?
    Dear Forum Member,

    Welcome to the forum.
    You are always welcome in my threads.
    And I welcome any comments you have about this this posting.
    Feel welcome in replying to this, and feel welcome to comment more than once.

    All of the above are okay.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Can I say "You are welcome to the forum", and similar sentences like "You are welcome to England", "You are welcome to our university"?
    I wouldn't ... it sounds like "You are welcome to (partake of) the forum/England/the university" -- just as "You are welcome to eat as much as you like."

    I would use "Welcome to the forum."
     

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you very much!

    A guest came to my house and had dinner with us.
    When he was about to leave, I said: "Welcome back".

    Is it right to say so?
    What I want to express is "We have enjoyed being together with you. I hope you can come again in the future."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    We say "Welcome back" as a greeting -- which you could have use with your guest as long as it wasn't his first visit. Instead, use "You're always welcome."
     
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