Welcome somebody to a place

MikeLynn

Senior Member
Hi everybody,
I've checked the dictionary here, all my dictionaries and grammar books, but I couldn't find the answer I wanted :eek:.
Anytime I hear a sentence like "They welcomed him to the meeting." or "They went to meet him at the airport and welcomed him to the country.", they seem to sound a bit bizarre. I know that you can say "Welcome to all kinds of places" and there are more structures available, but "to welcome somebody to a place" sounds rather unusual. My question is: are these grammatical, idiomatic and usual? Thank you for your help :)
M&L
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi everybody,
    I've checked the dictionary here, all my dictionaries and grammar books, but I couldn't find the answer I wanted :eek:.
    Anytime I hear a sentence like "They welcomed him to the meeting." or "They went to meet him at the airport and welcomed him to the country.", they seem to sound a bit bizarre. I know that you can say "Welcome to all kinds of places" and there are more structures available, but "to welcome somebody to a place" sounds rather unusual. My question is: are these grammatical, idiomatic and usual? Thank you for your help :)
    M&L
    Yes, indeed, they are. There is no difference in your examples from:

    "I welcomed him to my home" OR
    "The newly adopted baby was welcomed into our family immediately"
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    The song "We Welcome You to Munchkinland" (from the film "The Wizard of Oz") is playing in my head now. :) That's one example of welcoming someone to some place.

    I agree that it's a normal, common construction. I would say "I welcomed him into my home", but other than that I agree with all the previous posters.
     

    MikeLynn

    Senior Member
    Thank you for your answers. The reason why it seemed to sound so strange might have been that I'd heard it in the form of direct speech "Welcome to..." most of the time while the reported speech version may not be that common. I wasn't worried about the preposition, but about the active voice form of the verb welcome as I understand that in "Welcome to..." welcome is an interjection, at least that's what my dictionaries usually say then in "..you are (not) welcome..." it is probably a different part of speech-an adjective?-but something like "The owner welcomed them to the bar." sounded, except for the preposition, so easy and similar to Czech, that I was afraid there might be a problem. Thank you for making it clear to me.
     
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