welcome someone to do something

Hi, everyone.
Please help me with the usage of "welcome". In a conference situation, can we say "Let's welcome someone to deliver his or her speech on a certain issue"? That is, can we use the structure of "welcome someone to do something"? A google search result tells me this structure does exist but it is rarely used by English speakers. However, in my two physical dictionaries there is no listing of this structure.
If you native speakers of English do not use this structure in introducing a speaker at a conference and inviting him or her to give their talk on something, then what would you say instead?
Thanks.
Richard
 
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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    In my experience, this is fairly standard Chinglish (sorry). :) We (or at least I) don't use that construction. You would be better with something like this:

    Let's welcome Professor Ching who will be speaking to us today on the dining habits of the anteater. It promises to be a short talk.
     
    In my experience, this is fairly standard Chinglish (sorry). :) We (or at least I) don't use that construction. You would be better with something like this:

    Let's welcome Professor Ching who will be speaking to us today on the dining habits of the anteater. It promises to be a short talk.
    Yes, I heard a Chinese American professor, who now teaches at an American university, use this structure in his introducing of a keynote speaker at a conference on global studies this past weekend. As we Chinese think this way in Chinese, I suspected it would be Chinglish at that time. Now from your reply, I know it is indeed a Chinglish expression.
    There is this follow-up question for you: As the remark of "Let's welcome..." is usually made after a brief introduction of the speaker to the audience, and in the introduction the topic the speaker will talk about has already been mentioned before this welcome remark, then shall we simply say "Let's welcome Professor Ching" in this situation without repeating the topic the speaker will have OR do we still need to make this sentence a little bit longer and make it sound better?
    Thanks.
    Richard
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    There is this follow-up question for you: As the remark of "Let's welcome..." is usually made after a brief introduction of the speaker to the audience, and in the introduction the topic the speaker will talk about has already been mentioned before this welcome remark, then shall we simply say "Let's welcome Professor Ching" in this situation without repeating the topic the speaker will have?
    Yes, that would be perfect.
     
    Yes, that would be perfect.
    Thanks a lot. I oftentimes find many non-native speakers of English talk carelessly in English. I guess it is either because they concentrate too much on getting their ideas across in a pressing situation, thus having no energy left for the grammar issue, or because they have never developed that feel for the English language. In contrast, whenever I am trying to express myself in English, I try hard to make sure of my sentence structures. But this make-sure effort often makes me overly discreet and sometimes gives me a big headache.
     

    koble

    Senior Member
    Chinese-local dialect only
    In my experience, this is fairly standard Chinglish (sorry). :) We (or at least I) don't use that construction. You would be better with something like this:

    Let's welcome Professor Ching who will be speaking to us today on the dining habits of the anteater. It promises to be a short talk.
    Hi, Copyright

    May I bother you with a question, that why would the construction of welcome someone to do something give English native speaker such as yourself the idea that it's Chinglish?

    What's the logical or connotation behind the usage that we don't know of?I sense that it's beyond the grammatical reason for you avoid using that, don't you?

    So please, I will be indebted if you help me with this.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    May I bother you with a question, that why would the construction of welcome someone to do something give English native speaker such as yourself the idea that it's Chinglish?

    What's the logical or connotation behind the usage that we don't know of?I sense that it's beyond the grammatical reason for you avoid using that, don't you?

    So please, I will be indebted if you help me with this.
    When I suggest that something is Chinglish, I say that based on two things: 1) It is either ungrammatical or oddly phrased, and 2) I regularly hear it from native Chinese speakers, often because that's what they've been taught in English class by non-native English speakers. That's all ... nothing sinister. :)

    Two examples: I feel boring. It's not worth. Both are very common among native Chinese speakers of English. Hence, Chinglish. It's not a term I use in any derogatory way -- many of my Chinese friends know that they're not letter-perfect and ask me if certain phrases are Chinglish. In fact they use the term much more than I do. I'm always a bit reluctant if I don't know who I'm talking to. Like now. :D
     

    koble

    Senior Member
    Chinese-local dialect only
    When I suggest that something is Chinglish, I say that based on two things: 1) It is either ungrammatical or oddly phrased, and 2) I regularly hear it from native Chinese speakers, often because that's what they've been taught in English class by non-native English speakers. That's all ... nothing sinister. :)

    Two examples: I feel boring. It's not worth. Both are very common among native Chinese speakers of English. Hence, Chinglish. It's not a term I use in any derogatory way -- many of my Chinese friends know that they're not letter-perfect and ask me if certain phrases are Chinglish. In fact they use the term much more than I do. I'm always a bit reluctant if I don't know who I'm talking to. Like now. :D
    I'm really really sorry to make you feel that way, Mr Copyright. Perharps there would be less misunderstanding between us if i could say that to you in person, by which my sincerity would not be missed. Sorry.

    The fact is that I'm not upset, let alone offended by any means when a English native speaker say my English is Chinglish, a term, as you noticed, much more frequently used by my Chinese compatriots. So please rest assured that I was so just eager to know the reason behind the fact that you didn't use and avoided using that structure, unaware of the rudeness in my message. Again, another lesson learned and I will be more careful with my language next time.

    Sorry again for that.:(:D
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    No, no, no -- I didn't think you were rude at all and thought it was a very reasonable question. I'm sorry that my answer made you think otherwise. Everything's fine. :)
     

    gladorient

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    As a teacher of English Grammar here in china, I agree that "welcome someone to do something" is definitely Chinglish. The Chinese equivalent phrase can be used in such a structure, that's why my fellow Chinese tend to use welcome that way.
     

    gladorient

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    When I suggest that something is Chinglish, I say that based on two things: 1) It is either ungrammatical or oddly phrased, and 2) I regularly hear it from native Chinese speakers, often because that's what they've been taught in English class by non-native English speakers. That's all ... nothing sinister. :)

    Two examples: I feel boring. It's not worth. Both are very common among native Chinese speakers of English. Hence, Chinglish. It's not a term I use in any derogatory way -- many of my Chinese friends know that they're not letter-perfect and ask me if certain phrases are Chinglish. In fact they use the term much more than I do. I'm always a bit reluctant if I don't know who I'm talking to. Like now. :D
    Mr. Copyright: according to my understanding, "I feel boring" should be changed into "I feel it boring or I feel bored." "It's not worth" should be "It's not worthwhile." Am I right? Thank you!
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Hi, everyone.
    Please help me with the usage of "welcome". In a conference situation, can we say "Let's welcome someone to deliver his or her speech on a certain issue"? That is, can we use the structure of "welcome someone to do something"? A google search result tells me this structure does exist but it is rarely used by English speakers. However, in my two physical dictionaries there is no listing of this structure.
    If you native speakers of English do not use this structure in introducing a speaker at a conference and inviting him or her to give their talk on something, then what would you say instead?
    Thanks.
    Richard
    You've instinctively used the correct term in your post. If you want to make your invitation "warmer," you could add an adverb or two: "We cordially invite Richard to present...." This would sound quite welcoming.:)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You've instinctively used the correct term in your post. If you want to make your invitation "warmer," you could add an adverb or two: "We cordially invite Richard to present...." This would sound quite welcoming.:)
    As I understand it, Richard the Speaker is standing nearby waiting for you to finish your introduction of him before begin his talk or lecture. I personally wouldn't use "We cordially invite ..." in that case.
     

    koble

    Senior Member
    Chinese-local dialect only
    No, no, no -- I didn't think you were rude at all and thought it was a very reasonable question. I'm sorry that my answer made you think otherwise. Everything's fine. :)
    It's very nice of you to say that, Mr Copyright. I'm glad everything is fine.

    Back to my question, I presume you were saying that the problem with welcome someone to do somethingis oddity then?

    But how do you define whether a phrase is odd or not? (Please don't tell me is just based on your experience, I will shoot myself knowing that)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's very nice of you to say that, Mr Copyright. I'm glad everything is fine.

    Back to my question, I presume you were saying that the problem with welcome someone to do somethingis oddity then?

    But how do you define whether a phrase is odd or not? (Please don't tell me is just based on your experience, I will shoot myself knowing that)
    Put down that gun and I'll tell you the secret ... ok, it's based on experience. :)

    Yes, it's an odd phrasing. And you learn normal and odd and acceptable and universally understandable and creative-but-still-understandable phrasing simply by listening and reading ... as you do with any language. If it's any consolation, we're all still learning on this forum.
     

    koble

    Senior Member
    Chinese-local dialect only
    Put down that gun and I'll tell you the secret ... ok, it's based on experience. :)

    Yes, it's an odd phrasing. And you learn normal and odd and acceptable and universally understandable and creative-but-still-understandable phrasing simply by listening and reading ... as you do with any language. If it's any consolation, we're all still learning on this forum.
    Thank you again, Mr Copyright, for everything!

    So live and learn it is. :)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    When we say "(Let's) Welcome the speaker.", we are welcoming him to the stage, to this place where he is speaking. We are telling the audience to express to him "You are welcome here." (usually by applause, but they could say "Welcome!"). It's like saying "(Let's) Say "hello" to the speaker." Adding the speaker's purpose makes no sense.
     
    Put down that gun and I'll tell you the secret ... ok, it's based on experience. :)

    Yes, it's an odd phrasing. And you learn normal and odd and acceptable and universally understandable and creative-but-still-understandable phrasing simply by listening and reading ... as you do with any language. If it's any consolation, we're all still learning on this forum.
    Your explanation is enlightening! Thanks a lot.
    Richard
     
    It is more appropriate for a written invitation rather than a personal introduction, yes.
    How the majority of you native speakers of English feel about the English language is indeed what I badly need to know about and then with that acquired knowledge or feel I will make fewer mistakes in the future.
    Thanks for telling me about this usage.
    Richard
     
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