Welcome to(on,in)the date (of)

easychen

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

Today is April 6,2010. A person of ancient times came to us through a time machine. So, we would say to this person:

-Welcome to (or in or on) the date April 6, 2010.
-Welcome to (or in or on) date April 6, 2010.
-Welcome to (or in or on) the dateofApril 6, 2010.
-Welcome to (or in or on) date of April 6, 2010.
-Welcome to (or in or on) April 6, 2010.

Which of the above is proper?

Many thanks!
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Welcome to April 6th, 2010.

    Although when I'm talking to time-travelers who are obviously from ancient times, I tend to go for the big picture: Welcome to 2010. (I only mention month and day if I'm asked.)
     

    easychen

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Welcome to April 6th, 2010.

    Although when I'm talking to time-travelers who are obviously from ancient times, I tend to go for the big picture: Welcome to 2010. (I only mention month and day if I'm asked.)
    Thank you Copyright!

    But some told me that "to" is used of a place, i.e. "Welcome to Hongkong"
    And when it comes to time, "on" or "in" is used instead, i.e. "Welcome in 2010" "Welcome on April 6th,2010"
    I wonder if it makes any sense?

    By the way, is "date April 6th" the same as "date of April 6th"?
     
    Last edited:

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Welcome to April 6th, 2010.

    Although when I'm talking to time-travelers who are obviously from ancient times, I tend to go for the big picture: Welcome to 2010. (I only mention month and day if I'm asked.)
    :D:D:D:D

    (I agree with Copyright.)
    But some told me that "to" is used of a place, i.e. "Welcome to Hongkong"
    And when it comes to time, "on" or "in" is used instead, i.e. "Welcome in 2010" "Welcome on April 6th,2010"
    "Welcome in/on "sounds wrong, easychen: use "welcome to", even if you're not talking about a place.
     

    easychen

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    :D:D:D:D

    (I agree with Copyright.)

    "Welcome in/on "sounds wrong, easychen: use "welcome to", even if you're not talking about a place.
    Hi Loob,

    But I remember that in an American movie they said "Welcome in 20th century.?:confused:
     
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