welcome to (visit) my room

colum4

Senior Member
China-Chinese
Hi,

I see a sentence:welcome to visit my room


I know it is wrong, the right is:welcome to my

But I don't know the reason why it is wrong.

In my opinion, it's right grammatically.

Would you explain to me?



PS:please don't think there is you are in sentence


Thank you
 
Last edited:
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Either one can be correct, but their meanings are different. The correct one to use depends on the context. You didn't say what your context is.

    "You're welcome to visit my room" is an invitation you might give to a person in a different place. That person must go to your room in order to visit you there.

    "Welcome to my room" is something you might say to someone at your door as you ask him or her to enter.

    Which do you mean?
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    I'm afraid, colum4, that you'll find most answers to "why?" questions about the English language rather unsatisfying—something like, "Because that's the way we say it." You could indeed say "You are welcome to visit my room"—a perfectly acceptable sentence. But "welcome to visit my room" is not.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Welcome to my room is correct because it is an established idiom. It is used as a greeting and is technically, I think, an elision, a shortening of "I welcome you to my room.

    "Welcome to visit my room is incorrect, but (as others have said) you can make it correct by adding You are to the front:
    You are welcome to visit my room. -- This means: If you wish to visit my room, you may.
    It is simply not idiomatic to elide "you are" from this.
     

    colum4

    Senior Member
    China-Chinese
    Either one can be correct, but their meanings are different. The correct one to use depends on the context. You didn't say what your context is.

    "You're welcome to visit my room" is an invitation you might give to a person in a different place. That person must go to your room in order to visit you there.

    "Welcome to my room" is something you might say to someone at your door as you ask him or her to enter.

    Which do you mean?
    I'm afraid, colum4, that you'll find most answers to "why?" questions about the English language rather unsatisfying—something like, "Because that's the way we say it." You could indeed say "You are welcome to visit my room"—a perfectly acceptable sentence. But "welcome to visit my room" is not.
    Welcome to my room is correct because it is an established idiom. It is used as a greeting and is technically, I think, an elision, a shortening of "I welcome you to my room.

    "Welcome to visit my room is incorrect, but (as others have said) you can make it correct by adding You are to the front:
    You are welcome to visit my room. -- This means: If you wish to visit my room, you may.
    It is simply not idiomatic to elide "you are" from this.
    Hi,

    Now, I know.
    Thank you
     
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