welcome to - welcome in

ahsanmani

New Member
bangladesh
i need to know which one is correct form of using 'welcome to' or 'welcome in'? what should i say when i wanna say some one or even when i wanna present a company presentation?

if both one is correct then which one is more preferable and why?

thanks is advance.
 
  • Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    I've never heard "welcome in". It's always "welcome to ______", unless you're saying something else such as "you're always welcome in our house."
     

    difficult cuss

    Senior Member
    English England
    This is something that rattles me a little, when I was younger I never saw "welcome in", so to me the correct way is "welcome to". I think of "welcome in" as being either poor English or perhaps a direct translation from another language, although of course this is simply an opinion and and assumption. Anyone else?
     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    "Welcome in" just sounds weird to me, unless it's in a context like the one I mentioned. If one is speaking to people upon their arrival, it should be "welcome to ____".
     

    ahsanmani

    New Member
    bangladesh
    but is it ok or correct use when someone uses the text 'welcome in our organization' in a powerpoint presentaton towards some trainee. how can i tell him that he is using a wrong format of english, what the evidence do i have to prove my point?
     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    I think this is another one of those it's-just-the-way-it-is things, of which there are many in the English language.
     

    domangelo

    Senior Member
    United States English
    I believe that "welcome in" is interference from another language, since this is the way the phrase works in many other European languages. You might try singing the first line of the song Cabaret to your powerpoint presenter, just to stress this point:

    Willkommen, bienvenu, welcome,
    ins Kabaret, au cabaret, to cabaret!

    and while you're at it, please make sure you don't say "wanna". I am sure I am not the only one to have winced at reading it in your posting. It is far too familiar, and is only written in the most casual contexts.
     

    agustina bsas

    Senior Member
    Argentina - Spanish
    He too wants to own a farm to work in when he is not welcome in/to the farm anymore. ???

    Which is correct in this case? Is there another possibility?
     

    MarcB

    Senior Member
    US English
    Almost always welcome to. On a ship or airplane welcome abord. Sometimes welcome abord is used figuratively.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    He too wants to own a farm to work in when he is not welcome in/to the farm anymore. ???

    Which is correct in this case? Is there another possibility?
    This raises at least two issues.

    First, to address the "welcome to the farm" issue.
    If he is "welcome to the farm", it could mean that I don't care whether he gets to own the farm or not, but if he does, I don't care.

    Next, what preposition should be used in other contexts where we are talking about coming to, or visiting, the farm. Should it be in the farm, on the farm, at the farm - or can to the farm be understood and accepted in this context too?
    I don't know, but I feel that on the farm refers to the entire area of land comprising the farm, at the farm refers to the farmhouse and related buildings, in the farm sounds odd.
     

    Daniella_Green

    New Member
    English - United States
    I think this is another one of those it's-just-the-way-it-is things, of which there are many in the English language.
    Although there are different forms of using the English language, there are some exceptions.. Well, going back to the topic, I think that "Welcome to" is more appropriate rather than using "Welcome in.." For me, it sounds weird, but it doesn't just fit, or sound right..
     
    Welcome in/at apply more to something like topic of discussion instead of person. The house may not get welcome at the idea of fuel hike.

    Instead of 'welcome in' I'd suggest 'welcome at'. Perhaps those who said 'welcome in/at' emphasize to greet, receive with pleasure the guest to the place such as hotels or any place at which they are already being there. 'Welcome to' applies more general. Hotel officer who is heading to hotel along with a guest may say 'welcome to'. :)
     
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    iskndarbey

    Senior Member
    US, English
    It should always be "welcome to" when used as an exclamation: "Welcome to England", "welcome to my house", "welcome to Widgets, Inc.". "Welcome in..." used in this context is always incorrect, although it's common among non-native speakers. Many German cities especially have large signs that say "Welcome in Bremen", "Welcome in Erfurt", etc., that look ridiculous to native English speakers.

    "Welcome in/at" can be used when 'welcome' is an adjective: "You're always welcome in my house/at the corner shop."
     

    I_Daniel

    Member
    Afrikaans/South African English
    It should always be "welcome to" when used as an exclamation: "Welcome to England", "welcome to my house", "welcome to Widgets, Inc.".
    "Welcome in..." used in this context is always incorrect...
    "Welcome in/at" can be used when 'welcome' is an adjective: "You're always welcome in my house/at the corner shop."

    I agree with a minor change:-
    1.) "welcome to" is used in a greeting or an exclamation.
    2.) "You're always welcome in my house".
    This is used to show regard, friendship or appreciation of or for a person and to give that person an open invitation to your house or home.
     

    a.d.o.m.

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    I agree with all that has been said on this topic. But, however, I still have a question:

    You have explained the use of "welcome to" in several different contexts, but how about its non-context use? I mean: I know it is simpler and 100% correct to say "welcome". But, is it wrong to use "welcome in!"? I'm not a native, but I would swear I have heard this more than once.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The only instance I can think of is something like a New Year's celebration where you can say "Let's welcome in the New Year in New York this year!" This is not an exclamation like "Welcome to my world!" but rather using welcome as a transitive verb.
     

    galope2

    New Member
    German
    How about if we say:

    we were pleased to welcome you at/to our university?

    I would rather use "at" in this case, but i am still not quite sure about that..
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    How about if we say:

    we were pleased to welcome you at/to our university?

    I would rather use "at" in this case, but i am still not quite sure about that..
    Hi galope, and welcome to the forum:)

    I'd say that "to" is still the right choice in your context, especially if the person in question ("you") is joining the university in some way (as a student, a faculty member, a staff member).

    It is possible to use "at" in a different context: "I was welcomed warmly at the university but was received more coldly at city hall."
     

    galope2

    New Member
    German
    hi artichoke :)

    well, in this context the person "you" is not joining the university either as a student or as any kind of academic member. This person came to the university to give a lecture as part of a special event organized by the university. So he was at the university just for one day- well, to be more precise for a couple of hours:) Is it still "to" that we should prefer in this case? "We were pleased to welcome Prof. X to the University of Y."
    Thank you.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Yes, if you're going to phrase it as "we were pleased to welcome Prof X to the University of Y," it still has to be "to," even if it was just a brief lecture. To use "at" instead sounds very strange to me. Of course, you could always rephrase it as "The university of Y was pleased to welcome Prof X," which avoids the preposition altogether.:)
     

    galope2

    New Member
    German
    Thanks a lot for your answer(s). I particularly like your suggestion which excludes both of the prepositions
     

    oranges27

    New Member
    Polish
    Hi, I have read the answers but I do not know still if I can say: "we would love to welcome you in our store again!"
    I would be grateful for your help :)
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    You could say "... in(side) our store," as opposed to "... out on the sidewalk," but "to" sounds much better ther.

    And as long as I'm commenting on this thread:
    I feel that on the farm refers to the entire area of land comprising the farm, at the farm refers to the farmhouse and related buildings, in the farm sounds odd.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     

    Mark_Teacher

    New Member
    English- USA
    It's only been a few months since the first time I heard "Welcome in!" Someone who works at my usual morning QT (convenience store) was saying it, then someone else there was saying it, and I began to wonder if some QT suit had made it part of their program of friendliness. Then I heard it at a different QT a couple of weeks ago and believed my theory was confirmed. But tonight we ate at Bahama Breeze and they greeted us with this same clumsy expression.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    It's only been a few months since the first time I heard "Welcome in!" Someone who works at my usual morning QT (convenience store) was saying it, then someone else there was saying it, and I began to wonder if some QT suit had made it part of their program of friendliness. Then I heard it at a different QT a couple of weeks ago and believed my theory was confirmed. But tonight we ate at Bahama Breeze and they greeted us with this same clumsy expression.
    I really don't know what that might mean.

    In bad weather, I would probably accept "Welcome inside!", but that "Welcome in!" is weird.

    Was this by any chance in one of those places where people say things like "Would you like to come with?"?
     

    Jaswant Singh

    New Member
    Punjabi
    You are always welcome at my house
    He was welcomed at the university by the staff
    Welcome to the party
    Welcome in our organistaion ( on joining )

    I feel ‘welcome at’ is used for short stay
    ‘Welcome to’ for functions or a bit longer stay
    ‘Welcome in’ for a permanent stay ( atleast for some months or years)

    Am I right or wrong here?
    If wrong, please correct me. I want to know what is correct
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    The length of stay has nothing to do with it.

    There are at least two issues:

    1. Grammar.
    2. Meaning.

    "Welcome to ..." is a greeting, which has something to do with the verb "come" but is hard to analyse as a verb plus preposition. It does not mean "You are welcome to ...".

    "Welcome" can also be an adjective or a transitive verb.

    You are always welcome at my house. [adjective]
    He was welcomed at the university by the staff. [transitive verb in passive voice]
    Welcome to the party. [greeting]
    Welcome to our organisation. ( on joining ) [greeting]
     
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