Welcome to / You are welcome to a place

learntheworld

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, everyone!
I have a question about the use of "Welcome to". For example, a Chinese is going to visit America and he plans to go to Chicago. After knowing this, his American friend who lives in Los Angeles wants to welcome him through an online message. Could the American friend say "Welcome to Chicago", though this American lives in Los Angeles, rather than in Chicago. (I seemed to be told by a native English speaker that in similiar cases "You are welcome to Chicago" should be used instead.) I'm not quite sure. Thank you for your kind help!
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    1. Welcoming a person implies that you are a host and they are a visitor. You can only welcome them to a place they are visiting, and you can only welcome them if you live there.

    So an LA resident can say "Welcome to the US!" but not to Chicago.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    You can't welcome them to Chicago but you can say something like "I hope you have a good time in Chicago." or "I hope you enjoy Chicago."
     

    learntheworld

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    1. Welcoming a person implies that you are a host and they are a visitor. You can only welcome them to a place they are visiting, and you can only welcome them if you live there.

    So an LA resident can say "Welcome to the US!" but not to Chicago.
    Thank you for your help! So, in this case, I guess "You are welcome to Chicago" is also incorrect?
     

    learntheworld

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    You can't welcome them to Chicago but you can say something like "I hope you have a good time in Chicago." or "I hope you enjoy Chicago."
    Thank you for your excellent suggestion! So, in this case, I guess "You are welcome to Chicago" is also incorrect?
     
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