welcome / welcomed

perpend

Banned
American English
A) When you are late to work, it isn't exactly welcomed here.
B) When you are late to work, it isn't exactly welcome here.

Are they both okay? I don't even know as a native speaker. I feel like I'm making a grammar faux pas.
 
  • Rival

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    For me, both are OK.

    (A) uses a passive verb - 'it isn't exactly welcomed' by us
    (B) uses a simple adjective - 'it isn't exactly welcome'

    I prefer (B) because it's simpler, but it's purely a matter of personal choice.

    However, I wouldn't say 'When you are late to work ...'. I always try not to be late for work.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Thanks Rival. I think that's what I'm missing: verb vs. adj.

    That helps me understand the grammatical difference. Great sleuthing!

    Also, point taken regarding "late to/for work".

    Thanks again.
     

    cool-jupiter

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    <Merged with an earlier thread. Nat>

    Hi, native teachers. I've just searched the forum and had a look at several of the threads which I think are relevant to what I'd like to know about: welcome vs welcomed. A friend of mine from Chicago once gave me a very simple explanation of this; Use welcome when it is used in the present passive and use welcomed when it is used in the past or future passive.

    Any comment will be welcomed.

    You're welcome.

    I went to her birthday party, but I wasn't welcomed.

    Although my memory is vague, these are the sentences he gave me. But he also taught me that "Someone/Something would be welcome" is also a commonly-used set phrase. I've been confused by a turn of conversation like the following.

    X: We're going to have a drink at my place tonight. Do you want to come and join us?
    Y: That sounds awesome. But I'm a newbie here. Would I be welcome/welcomed?

    Which one would you choose? Your feedback will be welcomed!
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I'd choose "welcome" in that question. "Welcomed" is possible, but people don't use it much in my part of the world. "Welcome" is ordinary.
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree. Welcome is an adjective. Welcomed is part of the verb. So We weren't welcome means people didn't want us there. We weren't welcomed sounds bare on its own and means we weren't received formally. But people may have wanted you there.
    We weren't welcomed formally, but everyone was glad to see us.
    You're welcome to try - By all means try.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    X: We're going to have a drink at my place tonight. Do you want to come and join us?
    Y: That sounds awesome. But I'm a newbie here. Would I be welcome/welcomed?

    Which one would you choose? Your feedback will be welcomed!
    Both "welcome" and "welcomed" sound fine for me in (Y).
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Both "welcome" and "welcomed" sound fine for me in (Y).
    Both are grammatically correct. But I still say the difference is as I've described it, although I suppose it's not a great one in this case. You'd be more likely to say welcome, at least in BE. I hope this feedback is welcome.

    The government said it wanted to close the hospital. This development wasn't welcome.
     

    cool-jupiter

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    owlman5 - Thanks. I'll go with "welcome" here.

    rhitagwr - Your explanation makes it easy for me to understand. In this case, that's up to Y to decide. If he is imagining being at X's place, welcomed will be used. If he is concerned about him being still a newbie, welcome will be used.

    perpend - Like I said just here, that's up to Y to choose which one. Do I have your post right?
     
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