Welded insulation Cylinder

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elito

Member
Perú and spanish
Hello. I need some help regarding an expression I found in a Welded insulation Cylinder brochure. It says "supper vacuum system", vacuum and system are familiar, but I have problem with all the expression. I will appreciate any help.
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    The welder has a vacuum system, and that vacuum system is super (=outstanding). In other words, the part of the welder that provides a vacuum is super (=outstanding).

    Or was that your question? If not, please clarify your question and add more context.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Welded insulation cylinder" is not a common term and obviusly has a specific meanting. Through the use of Google, I found one reference HERE.

    You didn't provide anything in the way of context or descriptions, but if the reference I found is correct, you're talking about cylinders used to store liquefied gas such as liquid nitrogen.

    Containers for these liquids require insulation so that the contents do not simply boil off. Since a vacuum is an ideal insulator, these containers often are built of welded steel or stainless steel with a void from which nearly all the air has been removed, i.e. a vacuum.

    On a smaller scale, such containers might be used to store coffee or tea and can be found in your lunch box.

    Although people use the word "vacuum," it impossible to achieve a perfect vacuum, i.e. a state in which there are no molecules floating around.

    Different products come closer to achieving this ideal than others. In the case you specify, the manufacturer apparently is claiming that his vacuum is "super" (as cagey said, "outstanding,") although he doesn't quantify it.

    I don't believe the term has anything to do with the welding apparatus.
     

    elito

    Member
    Perú and spanish
    "Welded insulation cylinder" is not a common term and obviusly has a specific meanting. Through the use of Google, I found one reference HERE.

    You didn't provide anything in the way of context or descriptions, but if the reference I found is correct, you're talking about cylinders used to store liquefied gas such as liquid nitrogen.

    Containers for these liquids require insulation so that the contents do not simply boil off. Since a vacuum is an ideal insulator, these containers often are built of welded steel or stainless steel with a void from which nearly all the air has been removed, i.e. a vacuum.

    On a smaller scale, such containers might be used to store coffee or tea and can be found in your lunch box.

    Although people use the word "vacuum," it impossible to achieve a perfect vacuum, i.e. a state in which there are no molecules floating around.

    Different products come closer to achieving this ideal than others. In the case you specify, the manufacturer apparently is claiming that his vacuum is "super" (as cagey said, "outstanding,") although he doesn't quantify it.

    I don't believe the term has anything to do with the welding apparatus.
    Thanks to both of you. I got confused because of the double "P" in supper. Checking the dictionary "supper" refers to some kind of meal, so I said what?!!

    Sdgraham, the material you posted is very useful, it gives me more info. about this kind of cylinders.
     
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