Well-accomplished

Ben pan

Senior Member
chinese
I know that "well" can be placed before a past participle, to increase the extent to which something is acted on. For example, well-preserved, well-known, well-packed..


But when I use some word with very positive meaning themselves, can I put "well" before it? For example, "well-accomplished"?
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Shakespeare did.
    There are of course two meanings for "accomplished. I could easily say "a well-accomplished task. If you want to use "accomplished" in the sense of "skilled", I wouldn't say something like "a well-accomplished pianist". How were you thinking of using it Ben?
     

    Ben pan

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Well, actually, I was not using it or trying to use it. I just saw it being used by an American scholar. He says something like this: Qian Zhongshu, a native well-accomplished literary scholar in China.....
    I think he use it to mean a man with great achievement.
     
    "Well" is a kind of intensifier, so it can precede a variety of terms, often neutral or positive, e.g. "a well-worn path." This means, "worn a lot" or "much worn [walked on]."

    "His award was well deserved" means 'much deserved.'

    Note that 'well' is often not adding or affecting positivity; that is carried by the word following. "Worn" is neutral and remains so, in 'well worn.'

    "Well done," of course, is an exception to what I've just said.

    ---
    "Well accomplished" is a little odd, in your proposed use. More common is "well-recognized."

    ADDED: Velisarius, I think, has the same impression. "Accomplished" already contains the idea of doing well. Hence "well tried" makes sense [He used a well-tried approach to solve the problem] and "well accomplished" is a bit odd, though understandable.
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "He was a well-accomplished young man": he had many accomplishments.

    "A well-accomplished literary scholar": I think "well" may be redundant there. "An accomplished literary scholar" would have been sufficient.
     
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