"Well-balanced" Vs "Unbalanced"

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

Are the expressions, derived from "balanced", common/idiomatic in the contexts below? Please take a look.

1. Well-balanced: mentally stable, behaving in a normal way.

Ex.: John is a good professional He is always so sensible and a pretty well-balanced guy.


2. Unbalanced: not mentally stable, sometimes not behaving in a normal way.

Ex.: Jake is a good professional but he is a little unbalanced. That is a pity.


Thank you in advance!
 
  • Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Now, in 2016, I just heard a friend of mine who lives in the USA saying that "balanced" (unbalanced; well-balanced) isn't common (almost rare) in AmE in the examples I made in the O.P. Maybe it's just his experience. Maybe it's too formal for conversation in the USA.

    But it'd be a good idea to have an American English comment on this post.

    Let's wait for it.
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Now, in 2016, I just heard a friend of mine who lives in the USA saying that "balanced" (unbalanced; well-balanced) isn't common (almost rare) in AmE in the examples I made in the O.P. Maybe it's just his experience. Maybe it's too formal for conversation in the USA.

    But it'd be a good idea to have an American English comment on this post.
    I think a well-balanced person has a wide variety of interests/knowledge - he likes both sports and art, both classical and rock music, both technology and nature, etc.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you for your answers.

    I think a well-balanced person has a wide variety of interests/knowledge - he likes both sports and art, both classical and rock music, both technology and nature, etc.
    I would like to know what Americans use in place of "well-balanced" (= mentally stable, behaving in a normal way) in my example sentence.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It depends, since such a comment is likely to be made in response to a question or comment about the person; we don't normally say, "I want you to meet John; he's not mentally unstable." Among the possibilities are: mature, dependable, even-tempered, . . .
     
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