well-done, medium and raw?

goguma

Member
Korea, Korean
Hi!

When you order your steak in a restaurant, you can choose it well-done, medium, or rare.
In this situation, can the word, "raw" be used meaning "rare?"
 
  • Meadow Blue

    Banned
    England English
    Hi!

    When you order your steak in a restaurant, you can choose it well-done, medium, or rare.
    In this situation, can the word, "raw" be used meaning "rare?"
    Hi goguma,

    Not quite. A 'rare' steak is at least given some heat to seal the outside. The bloody interior is there for those who enjoy it.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    If you order a steak rare in France, you ask for it "bloody." That is to say the center is barely pink and juicy. (I get hungry for it as I write this missive). (I tried ordering a "bloody" steak in the U.S. once and got a strange look from the waiter who didn't see the humor in it)

    In France, you can also specify "blue," i.e. the outside is seared, but the center still has the blue color of uncooked meat. This is not common in the U.S. where one would have to ask for a very, VERY rare steak.

    "Raw" is the state of the meat as it leaves the butcher's block after being cut from the animal and is neither of the above.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    If you order a steak rare in France, you ask for it "bloody." That is to say the center is barely pink and juicy. (I get hungry for it as I write this missive). (I tried ordering a "bloody" steak in the U.S. once and got a strange look from the waiter who didn't see the humor in it)
    Actually, there's a common term for this in the U.S. - "blood rare".

    In France, you can also specify "blue," i.e. the outside is seared, but the center still has the blue color of uncooked meat. This is not common in the U.S. where one would have to ask for a very, VERY rare steak.
    In the U.S. there are many restaurants where "blue" or "blue rare" would be understood in the same way, in my experience.

    Here's a Wikipedia article on steaks that refers to this use of "blue":

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steak

    As a few comments on one board put it:

    "I'll have my steak blue" is a socially acceptable way of saying "just bring me the cow. I'll bite off my own steak!"

    Blue steak is the step below rare in "done-ness" (for lack of a better word). A "blue" steak is very red and cold in the center, while a "rare" steak is red and cool in the center.


    [edit]Sorry, quoted the wrong section initially.

    I agree with everyone else that "raw" is not the way a steak is ordered unless it's a special preparation such as Steak Tartare.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    It's a humorous term but it is possible to order it that way. "Charcoal" would be a steak that was burnt to a crisp, completely carbonized. I wouldn't want to eat the result. :)

    While working my way through college as a waiter I encountered a customer who had an aversion to any pinkness in meat. He asked for well-done and it was still not cooked enough for his taste. I took it back and asked the chef to cook it a little more; this will never endear you to a chef. I brought it back to the customer but it still wasn't good enough. After taking it back a second time, I watched the chef pick up the grate and lay the steak directly on the gas burner, then set the grate back down and work on other orders for a while. After several minutes he retrieved it, put it on the plate and demanded that I serve it that way. I did, and to my disbelief the customer raved about it. It was a black, crispy, shiny, shriveled shell of a thing but he loved it. THAT's what I would call "charcoal".
     
    Last edited:

    SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    I was in a restaurant in Washington DC last week end. The menu has an explanation of the cook's interpretation of the different degrees of "doneness". Under "well-done", it said "Order chicken". :(
     
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