We'll go for a walk as soon as I get home

  • dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hello drei_lengua;

    You can say: "Pójdziemy na spacer jak tylko przyjdę/wrócę do domu.".

    Regards,

    dn88
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hello drei_lengua;

    You can say: "Pójdziemy na spacer jak tylko przyjdę/wrócę do domu.".

    Regards,

    dn88
    I think I'd say:
    Pójdziemy na spacer jak wrócę (do domu). (seems most often used here)

    Cześć,
    Co to znaczy the following po angielsku?

    Pójdziemy - is this the command form? how is this different from Idziemy?
    przyjdę - I xxx
    wrócę - I return

    Dziękuję,

    Drei
    Pójdziemy is a rather kind of a promise, or simply an activity you're going to do, I'd say, it can also be used as a command. Idziemy sounds (almost) like an order here.
    przyjdę -- I'll come (in the context of your sentence, I come)

    Tom
     

    Marga H

    Senior Member
    Poland,Polish
    Hi Drei,
    ( my ) idziemy it is present = we are going ( for a walk)
    ( my ) pójdziemy it is future ( perfective aspect ) = we'll go (for a walk)
    Note that after " as soon as " and others similar expressions in time clauses in English you use present tense ( I get home ) but in Polish you have to use future ( przyjdę do domu = I'll come home or wrócę do domu = I'll come back home )
    Pozdrowienia.
     
    Hi Drei,
    ( my ) idziemy it is present = we are going ( for a walk)
    ( my ) pójdziemy it is future ( perfective aspect ) = we'll go (for a walk)
    Note that after " as soon as " and others similar expressions in time clauses in English you use present tense ( I get home ) but in Polish you have to use future ( przyjdę do domu = I'll come home or wrócę do domu = I'll come back home )
    Pozdrowienia.
    Dziękuję Marga (probably needs a special ending here that I haven't learned yet :)). Your explanation was quite helpful. So idziemy comes from iść and pójdziemy comes from pójść?

    iść = imperfective
    pójść = perfective
    Right?

    Also, one can only use the imperfective with other verbs like "I have to go." = "Muszę iść."?

    Drei
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Well, you can use btoh perfective and imperfective with musieć, it all depends on the context. Is there any rule that says otherwise?


    Tom
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    "Muszę iść." (looks fine the way it is) - "I have to go."
    "Muszę pójść." (seems incomplete to me, I would immediately ask "Gdzie?" = "Where?")
    "Muszę pójść do domu." (now, nothing is missing) - "I have to go home."
     

    Marga H

    Senior Member
    Poland,Polish
    Dziękuję Margo :) vocative case, it's easy! (probably needs a special ending here that I haven't learned yet :)). So idziemy comes from iść and pójdziemy comes from pójść?

    iść = imperfective
    pójść = perfective
    Right? right:thumbsup:

    Also, one can only use the imperfective with other verbs like "I have to go." = "Muszę iść."?

    Drei
    You can use each kind of infinitive: Muszę iść, muszę pójść also muszę chodzić ( repeated action )
     

    Marga H

    Senior Member
    Poland,Polish
    "Muszę iść." (looks fine the way it is) - "I have to go."
    "Muszę pójść." (seems incomplete to me, I would immediately ask "Gdzie?" = "Where?")
    "Muszę pójść do domu." (now, nothing is missing) - "I have to go home."
    I agree, but you can also say "Muszę iść do domu." and it means the same.
    Theoretically you use "muszę iść" at present, "muszę pójść" in the future and "muszę chodzić" for repeated action.However like in English we use present also for the near future. I think some examples will be helpful:
    Muszę już iść.- I have to go now.
    Muszę jutro iść do szkoły./ Muszę jutro pójść do szkoły. - I have to go to school tomorrow.
    Muszę chodzić na basen, żeby nauczyć się pływać. - I must go to the swimming-pool in order to learn to swim.
    Muszę chodzić w bucie ortopedycznym.- I have to wear an orthopedic shoe.
    Musisz iść/pójść do kina na ten film, jest świetny! - You must see this film, it's great!
     

    Piotr_WRF

    Senior Member
    Polish, German
    I don't want to confuse anyone, but there's another iterative besides chodzić, namely chadzać. It's not used very often, but you can hear sometimes. It's used for casual action, like Chadzam do kina, I go to the cinema from time to time.
     
    I agree, but you can also say "Muszę iść do domu." and it means the same.
    Theoretically you use "muszę iść" at present, "muszę pójść" in the future and "muszę chodzić" for repeated action.However like in English we use present also for the near future. I think some examples will be helpful:
    Muszę już iść.- I have to go now.
    Muszę jutro iść do szkoły./ Muszę jutro pójść do szkoły. - I have to go to school tomorrow.
    Muszę chodzić na basen, żeby nauczyć się pływać. - I must go to the swimming-pool in order to learn to swim.
    Muszę chodzić w bucie ortopedycznym.- I have to wear an orthopedic shoe.
    Musisz iść/pójść do kina na ten film, jest świetny! - You must see this film, it's great!
    Dziękuję Margo (już nauczłem się końiec :)) za świetny przykłady. :thumbsup:

    Drei
     
    I don't want to confuse anyone, but there's another iterative besides chodzić, namely chadzać. It's not used very often, but you can hear sometimes. It's used for casual action, like Chadzam do kina, I go to the cinema from time to time.
    Dziękuję Piotr. So there are 4 categories of verbs:

    1. imperfective - present
    2. perfective - future/past (I've also seen this in the past)
    3. name? - repeated action
    4. name? - casual action - I remember seeing jadać for eating. Can you give some more examples of this category? I don't quite understand its application.

    Danke im Voraus,

    Drei
     

    Piotr_WRF

    Senior Member
    Polish, German
    So there are 4 categories of verbs:

    1. imperfective - present
    2. perfective - future/past (I've also seen this in the past)
    3. name? - repeated action
    4. name? - casual action - I remember seeing jadać for eating. Can you give some more examples of this category? I don't quite understand its application.
    As far as aspects are concerned, there are two main categories:

    1. imperfective
    2. perfective

    Imperfective verbs can be used in all three tenses.

    Perfective verbs are only used in two tenses, past and future. Note however, that as far as the form is concerned, the future tense looks like a present. What follows is that there's no formal future for perfective verbs.
    Maybe an example will help understand this.

    Imperfective verb iść - to go:
    1. person sing. present: idę - I go
    1. person sing. future: będę iść - I will go

    Perfective verb pójść - to go:
    1. person sing. present: doesn't exist
    1. person sing. future: pójdę - I will go (this looks like a present but it's not, będę pójść :warn: is not possible)


    Iterative verbs are imperfective verbs that describe a non-single episode action. This can be a repeated, a casual or a habitual action. You can use them in all three tenses (past, present, future).
    Iterative verbs don't have a perfective counterpart and unlike perfective/imperfective aspectual pairs are regarded as distinct in lexical meaning.

    Iterative verbs are not very common in Polish (as opposed to Russian for example).
    Some examples are:

    chodzić - to attend, to wear
    Część uczniów nie chodzi regularnie do szkoły.
    Some students don't attend school regularly.
    Zawsze chodćę w kapeluszu.
    I always wear a hat.

    chadzać - to go from time to time / use to go (in the sense of to make one's way)
    Czasami chadzam do kina.
    I go to the cinema sometimes.

    The difference between chodzić / chadzać is not an aspectual one (both are iterative/habitual) but one in meaning.

    jadać - to eat from time to time / use to eat
    Na śniadanie jadam płatki kukurydziane.
    I usually eat cornflakes for breakfast.

    czytywać - to read from time to time / use to read
    Rzadko czytuję powieści kryminalne.
    I seldom read crime novels.

    dawać - to give from time to time / use to give
    Kiedyś zawsze dawałem matce kwiaty z okazji Dnia Matki.
    In the past I always used to give flowers to my mother on Mother's Day.
     

    Marga H

    Senior Member
    Poland,Polish
    Hello Drei and Piotr,
    let me add some remarks on the problem.
    Czasowniki wielokrotne ( interative verbs ) describe repeated action and in present tense are close in meaning to present simple tense in English.( We have discussed this topic in an old thread posted by Drei: about pisać)
    Only few verbs in Polish have these forms and they are falling in disuse.You can rarely hear someone saying that way, we use rather imperfective present instead ( with adverbs of frequency ).So:
    Pisuję często listy = Piszę często listy. -I often write letters.
    Na śniadanie jadam płatki kukurydziane.= Na śniadanie jem zwykle płatki kukurydziane. - I usually eat corflakes for breakfast.
    Drei, your confusion about chodzić i chadzać was because of untypical case.That looks like for instance: jeść / jadać but it is not the same.
    I don't agree with Piotr at that point: I think nowadays there is no difference in meaning, both mean exactly the same, yet chadzać is old-fashioned whereas chodzić became interative form from iść.
    Note: We have in Polish only 2 verbs that we can't use the same form to translate English present simple and present continuous tenses.
    Usually it goes like this:
    I learn Polish every day. - Uczę się polskiego codziennie.
    I am learning now.- Uczę się teraz.
    but:
    I go to school every day.-Chodzę do szkoły codziennie.
    I am going to school now.- Idę do szkoły teraz.
    also:
    I often go to Warsaw.-Często jeżdżę do Warszawy.
    I am going to Warsaw now.- Jadę teraz do Warszawy.
    iść/chodzić and jechać/jeżdzić aren't interchangeable.
    Regards.
     

    Marga H

    Senior Member
    Poland,Polish
    Iterative verbs are imperfective verbs that describe a non-single episode action. This can be a repeated, a casual or a habitual action.

    Iterative verbs are not very common in Polish (as opposed to Russian for example).
    Some examples are:


    dawać - to give from time to time / use to give
    Kiedyś zawsze dawałem matce kwiaty z okazji Dnia Matki.
    In the past I always used to give flowers to my mother on Mother's Day.
    Objection! Piotr, dawać it is imperfective aspect ( daję, dawałem, będę dawać or będę dawał ) dać is its perfective partner ( dałem, dam )
     
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