well maybe more than, I'm a curiosity, you know what I mean

vladv

Senior Member
Russian-Russia
Could you please tell what is the underlined means in the context? Seems incomprehensible to me.

"I mean, I'm going deaf, I've got Tinnitus, my hands just about work," Clapton, 72, continued. "I mean, I'm hoping that people will come along and see me just because, well maybe more than, I'm a curiosity, you know what I mean." Eric Clapton says he's going deaf
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's the casually broken grammar of speech. You wouldn't write this. It seems to mean he thinks he's not really worth seeing any more (as a serious musician), but he hopes people will come along and see him for another reason: he's a 'curiosity', someone who's interesting. As if they're thinking: This is the famous Eric Clapton who used to be so good. So 'just because' he's a curiosity, or maybe a bit more than that: maybe because his music is still part of it too.

    Grammatically what is implied is 'just because I'm a curiosity, or in fact for a slightly better reason than that'.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    This is ad-lib conversation, so it normally won't be as "correct" as writing that has had a bit of thought put into it. For meaning, let me rephrase it and see if that helps:

    "I mean, I'm hoping that people will come along and see me just because I'm a curiosity – well, maybe more than a curiosity, you know what I mean."

    Cross-posted.
    And changing "mean" to "meaning" in the second sentence.
     
    Last edited:

    vladv

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    This is ad-lib conversation, so it normally won't be as "correct" as writing that has had a bit of thought put into it. For mean, let me rephrase it and see if that helps:

    "I mean, I'm hoping that people will come along and see me just because I'm a curiosity – well, maybe more than a curiosity, you know what I mean."

    Cross-posted.
    Thanks
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    My second sentence should have said "For meaning, let me rephrase it ..."

    I've corrected it in post 2 – thanks. :)
     
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