well-meaning but wrong!

newname

Senior Member
Vietnamese
Imagine this situation:

You heard a cry in your neighbour's house. Suspecting something bad happened, you broke into the house and at that very moment the house owner arrived at the door.

In this situation, what is the phrase/idiom/saying., if any, to describe your situation? (like when you lost your car and someone consoled you by saying "bad luck! but every cloud has a silver lining")

Is it, You are well-meaning but legally wrong?

Thank you very much.
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    People do occasionally say:
    No good deed goes unpunished.
    This is a reversal of the idea people expect to hear, which is:
    "No bad deed goes unpunished; no good deed goes unrewarded."

    It's not a saying with as long a history as "Every cloud has a silver lining", nor is it as poetic.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    People do occasionally say:
    No good deed goes unpunished.
    Very good! Edit: Actually, it's excellent. I like it better than the "good intentions" one because it's shorter, smoother and because it's in chronological order: the good deed comes before the punishment. :)

    It's not a saying with as long a history as "Every cloud has a silver lining", nor is it as poetic.
    I'm still waiting to hear what the silver lining is in losing you car in the original message. Although I guess if you lost it over a cliff and you weren't in it....
     
    Last edited:

    Starfrown

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I'm still waiting to hear what the silver lining is in losing you car in the original message. Although I guess if you lost it over a cliff and you weren't in it....
    For that matter, I'm trying to find the silver lining in having your neighbor catch you breaking into his house but "only because I heard a cry, honest!"
    :)
     

    newname

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Very good! Edit:

    I'm still waiting to hear what the silver lining is in losing you car in the original message. Although I guess if you lost it over a cliff and you weren't in it....
    It sounds crazy but my reasoning goes like this (In fact it is based on a fable about a man who was lucky to lose his horse)

    You lost your car: bad luck. The next day the police went to your home telling you your car had exploded outside the ABC embassy. They suspected you are involved in the terrorist attack.

    So, losing the car (bad luck) -> your life saved (good luck) -> being a terrorist suspect (bad luck) and this will keep going. :)

    Do you know the philosophy of yin and yang? (It's Chinese and I'm Vietnamese:eek:)
     
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