Well-read vs renowned

Syed Muhammad

Senior Member
Urdu
Hi there!
I'm here again with a question to disturb you 😃
I have an Urdu article to translate into English in which I have to quote a famed writer. For the person, I want to use the wording "a well-read/renowned scholar". Can I do it in this way? Or it would be redundant.
Many thanks for your help in advance.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    The two words have quite different meanings.

    All scholars are, by definition, well-read, i.e. they have read a lot of books.
    Not all scholars are renowned, only the famous ones.
     

    duhveer

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Well, it all depends on the context in which that sentence is given. To my mind, the use of renowned implies acclamation and glory, which might not be appropriate for your context. The words "remarkable" and "well known" are sure to work.
     

    Syed Muhammad

    Senior Member
    Urdu
    Well, it all depends on the context in which that sentence is given. To my mind, the use of renowned implies acclamation and glory, which might not be appropriate for your context. The words "remarkable" and "well known" are sure to work.
    Thanks! Then I'm going to go with the "well known", or the "famous" one (as KB suggests). Also: The Julian Stuart's option could be fit in with what I want to construct as follows:
    "Now I'm quoting a widely-read scholar in the case of the Babri mosque-demolition". Does this work?
     
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