wenn sie sich herausnehmen Freiheiten

j-Adore

Senior Member
English (BrE)
"Ich mag ja grummeln, wenn sie sich herausnehmen Freiheiten, aber ..."


I'm not sure why the word order in the "wenn" subordinate clause is the way it is, not placing the verb "herausnehmen" at the last -- instead of "wenn sie sich Freiheiten herausnehmen".


The same goes for the following sentence:

"ich bin dankbar, dass es hier überhaupt noch gibt Soldaten, die genießen mein Essen."

{instead of}: "ich bin dankbar, dass es hier überhaupt noch Soldaten gibt, die genießen mein Essen."


Incidentally, what does the expression "sich herausnehmen Freiheiten" mean here, exactly?

Does it mean "treat someone without respect by being too friendly, forward"?
 
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  • JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    You are right: it should be "...., wenn sie sich Freiheiten herausnehmen".
    and
    "ich bin dankbar, dass es hier überhaupt noch Soldaten gibt, die mein Essen genießen."

    Where do these sentences come from?

    what does the expression "sich Freiheiten herausnehmen" mean?
    Does it mean "treat someone without respect by being too friendly, forward"
    It means "to take liberties with s.b." - which is not exactly "by being too friendly"...
     

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    @JClaudeK Merci. So "sich Freiheiten herausnehmen" must mean "do as he pleases as if he owns the place"?

    These two sentences were supposed to be translated from English to German by a professional translator...

    Is there a justification for this specific word order -- like a regional variation, or the mimicking of the old-fashioned speech?

    Or could this be an intentional error, the translator trying to capture how a country bumpkin speaks?
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    These two sentences were supposed to be translated from English to German by a professional translator...
    By the way, "Ich mag ja grummeln, wenn ..." is not very current either.
    So "sich Freiheiten herausnehmen" must mean "do as he pleases as if he owns the place"?
    Yes, that's better.
    In this context, it could (f.i.) mean that the soldiers flick the cook's bottom.
     
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