went into a fugue state and <came to with>

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Does "came to with" here mean "came to join them with"?

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Two friends from Texas came to visit on my first 'gram-free day. They are wonderfl and photogenic, so when they did things like sip wine on my fire escape, I went into a fugue state and came to with approximately 75,000 new pictures in my camera roll.

By Hannan Smothers
Source: Cosmopolitan Novermber 2019
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    No. It means something like I regained my awareness of what I was doing. She returned to normal consciousness after being in a fugue state and taking 75,000 photographs.:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited:

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    A fugue state is a psychological state in which a person is disconnected from reality. To "come to" means, in general, to wake up. In this case, it means to connect again with reality.

    Cross-posted.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Thank you.

    No. It means something like I regained my awareness of what I was doing. She returned to normal consciousness after being in a fugue state and taking 75,000 photographs.:rolleyes:
    But was it possible to take 75,000 photographs during the time of sipping wine on her fire escape? It appears to be too many to be done to me.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's a fine example of a large mound of cattle manure. She'd be pushed to take a couple of photos in a fugue, let alone 75,000.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Dozens of pics, that is a reasonable guess.

    It looks wierd that she chose the number 75,000, which is so specific that is hard to imagine it is simply an exaggeration and has contributed the confusion of my understanding. Is it common for native speakers to exaggerate this way?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Any random large number would serve the purpose. If the number is too big to believe, don't believe it.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Not the ones I converse with regularly. It is fairly common for dramatic speakers to exaggerate things. Isn't that also true in China?
    Yes. But in China it is usually done in a distinctive way like: one hundred, one thousand or ten thousand photos. The number 75,000 photos would be regarded as an actual number of photos taken.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Yes. But in China it is usually done in a distinctive way like: one hundred, one thousand or ten thousand photos. The number 75,000 photos would be regarded as an actual number of photos taken.
    Thank you. Many exaggerations over here follow the same general pattern that you mention. But it is definitely possible, as we have seen, for a writer to pluck some unusual number out of her mind and use it in an exaggeration.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    If so, the same here. Numbers like 888 or 8,888 could be used in China because Chinese sense it as auspicious. Of course such numbers are still distinctive (a Chinese would hardly likely use 75,000 except it happens to be his lucky number).

    Thank you for your information.
     
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