Went to Fetch a Blaze , She married

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ayed

Senior Member
Arabic(Saudi)
Hi, WRPs all you .

I want a proverb or an expression that holds connotation of the following anecdote:
Once upon a time , a tribal man commanded his daughter to go up to their neighbor for fetching a blaze( a wood stick burning) to set their fire.
The daughter went and did not get back home.What happened was that the daughter had found a man whom she got fond of and married him .Later on , she got back home.So, her family said:"Went to fetch a blaze and she married .It is sometimes said when one is asked to bring something and he/she gets back too late .


Mashkoreen(you're thanked)
 
  • evilregis

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    I cannot think of any similar expressions/stories in English that even come close to something like this.
     

    Ms Missy

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It's difficult to tell just what this connotes. Perhaps if we had more of an idea of the resulting consequences from "getting back too late," someone might be able to assist you. Most English proverbs contain a "lesson" that someone has learned as a result of their actions. What lesson is there to be learned from your anecdote?
     

    Murdoc

    New Member
    English, Wyoming - USA
    I've heard of a similar situation being called, "he/she went for cofee". In my understanding, someone somewhere and at some time said they would be going somewhere and never returned, (or were delayed). I guess getting married is as good a reason as any not to return promptly.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It's not a proverb, but in the lore of Country Music the abandoning husband and father always went out for a packet of cigarettes and never returned.
    Such an example would be rather less acceptable in these non-smoking days.
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Shokrun Jazeelan ,
    The idea is that when you ask someone to bring something and he/she gets back "too late".
    thank you very much
     

    Ms Missy

    Senior Member
    USA English
    This could be interpreted 2 ways, depending on the ultimate outcome or consequences involved in the daughter's late return:

    1. "Better late than never." (at least she finally returned)

    2. "Opportunity knocks but once." (This was the daughter's one opportunity to get married)

    I know neither of these apply to your passage, but it's very difficult to interpret folklore from another culture.

    Sorry I couldn't be of more help!
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    This could be interpreted 2 ways, depending on the ultimate outcome or consequences involved in the daughter's late return:

    1. "Better late than never." (at least she finally returned)

    2. "Opportunity knocks but once." (This was the daughter's one opportunity to get married)

    I know neither of these apply to your passage, but it's very difficult to interpret folklore from another culture.

    Sorry I couldn't be of more help!
    Shokrun Jazeelan ya Ms. Missy
     
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