were getting at

< Previous | Next >

taraa

Senior Member
Persian
Why is it in continuous form? Can you please explain its meaning?
"Do the sentences in (10)-(13) seem to say what the ungrammatical (b) sentences in (6)-(9) were getting at?"
Source
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The informal expression “What are you getting at?” (= What do you mean? / What are you implying? [by that]) is only ever said in the present or past progressive.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    The informal expression “What are you getting at?” (= What do you mean? / What are you implying? [by that]) is only ever said in the present or past progressive.
    Thanks a lot!
    Is its present "...sentences in (6)-(9) get at", please?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No. As I said, it only has that meaning in the progressive, whether you say it in the present or the past tense.

    To get at something means to reach it, and to get at someone (BE) means to criticise them, but these are different uses.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    No. As I said, it only has that meaning in the progressive, whether you say it in the present or the past tense.

    To get at something means to reach it, and to get at someone (BE) means to criticise them, but these are different uses.
    I understand.Thank you very much!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top