We're not going to arrive in London <until> around 6:00

JJXR

Senior Member
Russian
Hello to all,

Thanks for reading my post.


Context:

The speaker and his/her companion are on their way to London. The speaker says one of the sentences below.

Sample sentences:

1. We're not going to arrive in London until around 6:00.

2. We're not going to arrive in London around 6:00.

Question:

Let's assume that "around 6:00" is the time between 5:55 and 6:05.

Sentence #1 means that we are going to arrive in London either between 5:55 and 6:05 or after 6:05, but not before 5:55.

Sentence #2 means that we are going to arrive in London either before 5:55 or after 6:05, but not between 5:55 and 6:05.

Is this correct?


Thanks a lot for any comments, corrections or suggestions!

Regards,
JJXR
 
  • Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    What you lack here is context - that makes it very difficult to comment. Sentences like these don't appear from nowhere. There must be a reason for them.

    Example 1

    John: When you arrive in London, will you be able to join us for a coffee at 5:30?
    Jane: No, sorry. I'm not going to arrive in London until around 6:00.


    Jane's purpose is simply to explain that she won't be in time for coffee because her arrival time is after 5.30 (and approximately at 6:00)

    Example 2

    Your second sentence seems rather unlikely. To make it work, I will have to invent a scenario.

    John: I hear you are going to arrive in London around 6:00 Is that correct?
    Jane: No, I'm not going to arrive in London around 6:00. I will probably get there much earlier, say, 5:00


    Jane is simply contradicting John's false belief.
     
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