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Samura

Senior Member
Hindi
Hello, Today I've found something new which I knew a long time ago. See these below sentences
Present imaginary situation
A. If you were /were to god, would you get me a car ?
it implies that he is not god and he can not get her a car. isn't it ?

Past imaginary situation which never happened

A. If you were to have been god, would you have got me a car?
B. if you had been god , would you have got me a car?
It means that he was not god and he didn't got her car.

It would happy to know the sense above of these sentences .
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    1. There is no verb "to god".

    2. We don't create imaginary situations (using "if") to mean/imply that the opposite is true. So the answer is that these sentences do not "imply/mean" what you said.

    We create imaginary situations to consider alternatives. For example:

    These traffic rules are unfair. If you were in charge, wouldn't you change the traffic rules?

    That sentence looks correct to me. If I was your teacher, I would mark your answer as correct.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    A. If you were /were to god, would you get me a car ?
    it implies that he is not god and he can not get her a car. isn't it ?
    A. If you were god, would you get me a car ? :arrow:This one is sort of okay. It refers to an imaginary present situation.
    A. If you were to be god, would you get me a car ?:arrow: You can't say "were to god" unless "god" is a verb, but it would almost work with "be" or "become". With "become" it would refer to an imaginary future situation. With "be" it also has more of a future than present feel to it.
    A. If you were to have been god, would you have got me a car?:arrow: This is not idiomatic. Use B instead.
    B. if you had been god , would you have got me a car?:arrow: (Better with "gotten", I think). Yes, this means what you want it to mean.
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    It's usual to use an initial capital letter for God if that's the name of the omnipotent deity, If you think he is simply one of several divine beings, then he's a god.
     
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