Were you able to make your flight?

chacahua

Senior Member
Midwestern American English
Hi, all. I realize we can use “llegar a tiempo” or something similar to express the idea of making a flight — i.e., not missing it. I also know we can use “perder el vuelo” to express missing a flight. (Maybe there are better ways - that’s the one I know.)

But does anyone have a nice, concise way of saying, for example, “Were you able to make your flight?” or are we just stuck with things like “Pudiste llegar a tiempo para tu vuelo?”

Thanks in advance!
 
  • Ferrol

    Senior Member
    Spanish.España
    En España : “¿Llegaste a tiempo para coger el vuelo?”, o “¿Pudiste/conseguiste coger el vuelo?”. Fuera de España supongo que usan “tomar el vuelo”
     

    ilya

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain), German
    In Spain: "¿Pillaste tu vuelo?"
    "Alcanzaste tu vuelo" would sound very formal or even literary (albeit correct) in Spain.
     

    chacahua

    Senior Member
    Midwestern American English
    Mil gracias a todos - me han dado exactamente lo que esperaba.

    ¡Muy feliz día!
     

    chacahua

    Senior Member
    Midwestern American English
    En España : “¿Llegaste a tiempo para coger el vuelo?”, o “¿Pudiste/conseguiste coger el vuelo?”. Fuera de España supongo que usan “tomar el vuelo”
    Excelente, Ferrol - muchas gracias.

    Por cierto, estoy casado con una colombiana y usamos el verbo “coger” día y noche, en mil maneras diferentes - incluyendo con vuelos, buses, trenes, taxis, Ubers, etc. Fuera de Colombia, no soy ningún tipo de experto en esto, pero allá por lo menos, usar “coger” como lo usaste en tu respuesta sería totalmente normal y natural.

    That’s maybe telling you a bunch of stuff you already know even better than I, but whatever the case, thanks again for your help - it’s much appreciated 🍻
     

    The cub

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    One up for - "Alcanzaste tu vuelo". Keep it simple and universal

    Well, it's not so universal. I wouldn't expect someone from Spain to say that (though it would be understood). The most common way here would be "coger el vuelo" or, speaking more colloquially, "pillar el vuelo", as ilya suggested.
     

    ilya

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain), German
    I think the choice depends a lot of what your public or target is. If you need to have some simple text understood in all Spanish-speaking countries, you would decide against "pillar" and even against "coger", of course, and "alcanzar" would work well.
    But if you are translating a book which will be published in Spain (book markets are quite country-specific still) and you have to translate a dialogue between two friends, you would definitely write "¿Llegaste a pillar el vuelo?" or "¿Llegaste a coger el vuelo?".
    Being "universal" would downgrade literature to a standard language which nobody feels as a natural way of speaking and would therefore be a bad translation, if the English original did feel natural to the reader.
    There is no way to write a dialogue in Spanish which will feel natural to ALL Spanish readers, if only because Argentina will be automatically out as soon as you write "Tú llegas" instead of "Vos llegás". So you have to make choices.
     

    gato radioso

    Senior Member
    spanish-spain
    Vaya, ¿nadie diría "¿alcanzaste tu vuelo?"?
    Not really, in Spain at least.
    If you say alcanzar it implies somehow that the plane out of your reach: for example, positioned in a strange place or already moving along the runway, and that´s not usually the case.
     
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