We've had a bit more money and that

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
do without
If you do without something you need, want, or usually have, you are able to survive, continue, or succeed although you do not have it.
We've had a bit more money and that, and the baby doesn't do without.
Collins Cobuild

Hello.
I think I don't undrstand the sentence.
Maybe it means:
"We've had a bit more money and so forth, as well as we've had the things the baby doesn't do without":confused:
If so, why is the present perfect used? Do they still have it all or do they no longer have all these things ?
Thanks.
 
  • rosaespanola

    Member
    English
    I would understand that to mean that they have had more money than usual recently, and therefore the baby does not have to go without the things that it needs.
    The phrase "the baby doesn't do without" means that it has everything it needs. "And that" is kind of a way to say "and so on", it's quite an informal, colloquial expression to use. It's used commonly where I live (northern England) but I wouldn't expect to hear it everywhere in the English-speaking world.

    Hope that helps!

    do without
    If you do without something you need, want, or usually have, you are able to survive, continue, or succeed although you do not have it.
    We've had a bit more money and that, and the baby doesn't do without.
    Collins Cobuild

    Hello.
    I think I don't undrstand the sentence.
    Maybe it means:
    "We've had a bit more money and so forth, as well as we've had the things the baby doesn't do without":confused:
    If so, why is the present perfect used? Do they still have it all or do they no longer have all these things ?
    Thanks.
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    Judging by the hits in google, this seems to be a sentence that dictionaries published by non-native speakers copy from each other. A native speaker would say We've had a bit more money than that, and the baby doesn't do without.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I would understand that to mean that they have had more money than usual recently, and therefore the baby does not have to go without the things that it needs.
    The phrase "the baby doesn't do without" means that it has everything it needs. "And that" is kind of a way to say "and so on", it's quite an informal, colloquial expression to use. It's used commonly where I live (northern England) but I wouldn't expect to hear it everywhere in the English-speaking world.!
    Concur with this interpretation. As an AE speaker, I would say "and all" instead of "and that."

    Judging by the hits in google, this seems to be a sentence that dictionaries published by non-native speakers copy from each other. A native speaker would say We've had a bit more money than that, and the baby doesn't do without.
    On the other hand, exgerman's version ("a bit more money than that") would only work if the previous financial situation had already been discussed.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I agree with RM1, but I have definitely heard BE speakers use and that in this sort of context.

    That said, I can't figure out what the present perfect is used either. I think all it means is that they've had a bit more money and so forth recently, and that's why the baby doesn't "do without" (that is, the baby has everything it really needs).
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    We've had a bit more money and that, and the baby doesn't do without.

    This sounds like BE as spoken by a less formally educated person (I'm not sure how to put that tactfully)

    Paraphrase

    We've recently had a bit more money and so forth, and the baby doesn't lack the necessities of life.


    (I think that this has been said but I'm putting it all together)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    What I can't understand are two things:):
    1.this fragment: "and (.......) the baby doesn't do without" -- am I right that the things necessary for the baby are implied in the brackets? In other words - what is the object of "without" ? Or maybe "without" refers to the first part of the sentence?
    2.As to the present perfect: if the "have" is used in the meaning of "possess", why is it not "We have a bit more money"? Or maybe is the "have" used in the meaning of "have made/earned money"?
     
    Last edited:

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    1. Without means "without anything that's really needed," e.g.:
    "My parents never had much money, but we never had to do without."
    "We did without for the first few years we were married."


    2. This is a bit of a puzzle. The way I read it is, "We have had a bit more money (recently)."
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thank you.
    do without is in the Wordreference Dictionary. Though, "do without" in the Collins' dictionary (which WR uses) is a bit larger:
    do without (, preposition)
    1) to forgo; manage without
    I can't do without cigarettes
    2) not to require (uncalled-for comments or advice)
    we can do without your criticisms thank you
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I'd say "The parents decided to do without luxuries so that the baby didn't have to go without." There is a difference between "Do without something" (often by choice) and to "go without" (be deprived of something, usually food).
     

    rosaespanola

    Member
    English
    We've had a bit more money and that, and the baby doesn't do without.

    This sounds like BE as spoken by a less formally educated person (I'm not sure how to put that tactfully)
    Let's not get into the debate about whether regional variations in English = sounding like you're not well educated. The expression "and that" is in common usage where I live, from people of all educational backgrounds. I have a post-graduate degree and I use "and that" regularly. It's the way that we speak in my region. I would hope people don't automatically assume that means I'm uneducated.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Let's not get into the debate about whether regional variations in English = sounding like you're not well educated. The expression "and that" is in common usage where I live, from people of all educational backgrounds. I have a post-graduate degree and I use "and that" regularly. It's the way that we speak in my region. I would hope people don't automatically assume that means I'm uneducated.
    Apologies :eek:
     
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