what are these lines in your face called in English?

u-1

Senior Member
Japanese
Good morning,

I have a question.

When you get old, sometimes you can see two lines like wrinkles on your face that go across from both sides of your nose to both ends of your mouth. These lines go along the cheeks.

Mmm, it is really really difficut to describe the lines in English.

Anyway, my question is that if there is a word for these lines (wrinkes)?

I know the way I described the lines is really confusing because of my lack of Englsih skills. I'm sorry.

Thanks for reading my quesiton anyway.
 
  • wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Good morning,

    I have a question.

    When you get old, sometimes you can see two lines like wrinkles on your face that go across from both sides of your nose to both ends of your mouth. These lines go along the cheeks.

    Mmm, it is really really difficut to describe the lines in English.

    Anyway, my question is that if there is a word for these lines (wrinkes)?

    I know the way I described the lines is really confusing because of my lack of Englsih skills. I'm sorry.

    Thanks for reading my quesiton anyway.

    What about deep lines, deep creases or fine lines, fine facial creases?
     
    Last edited:

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    If someone comes up with a word, I'll bet it will turn out to be a technical term known only by anatomists and plastic surgeons who do facial surgery. I don't think there is a widely-known, widely-understood, or widely-used word in English for what you are describing.

    In English, we do talk about "wrinkles" on a face, but they are not limited to the two places you specify.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Good morning,

    I have a question.

    When you get old, sometimes you can see two lines like wrinkles on your face that go across from both sides of your nose to both ends of your mouth. These lines go along the cheeks.

    Mmm, it is really really difficut to describe the lines in English.

    Anyway, my question is that if there is a word for these lines (wrinkes)?

    I know the way I described the lines is really confusing because of my lack of Englsih skills. I'm sorry.

    Thanks for reading my quesiton anyway.
    Nasolabial fold.
     

    Sprache

    Senior Member
    English/inglés
    Oh really - lack of other context I would interpret "laughter lines" as referring to the ones emanating from the corners of the eyes. Maybe I've been misinterpreting that term all this time!
    Here we call the wrinkles in the corners of the eyes "crow's feet". Laugh lines are the ones that the thread-starter described in the original question. I don't know if it's commonly used in other places, though.
     
    Last edited:

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Here we call the wrinkles in the corners of the eyes "crow's feet". Laugh lines are the ones that thread-starter described in the original question. I don't know if it's commonly used in other places, though.
    Yes, we call them crow's feet too. I thought crow's feet and laughter lines were synonymous - it could well be I've just misunderstood the term all this time. Any BE commentators??
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    It was over the phone, so we'll never know. :D
    However, she is quite knowledgeable on the subject. ;)
    I've just googled "laughter lines definition" and 5 of the top 7 results (and the other two didn't seem to relate to the question at all as far as I could see) - including the macmillan dictionary which is marked as being an AE dictionary - define "laughter lines" as being those around the eyes:).

    http://www.google.co.uk/search?num=...=laughter+lines+definition&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Timpeac, is this part of your working vocabulary or did you look it up? (Or are you a plastic surgeon?)
    Ah Fabulist, you've caught me. In fact it's part and part. I knew that it was a phrase like that, but I did google it first before posting.

    On the other hand, and vulgar alert for those who worry about those things - the colloquial term that occurs to me about those wrinkles is "blow job wrinkles" - which definitely isn't a synonym for crow's feet...
     
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