What are you here for, then?/What are you good for then?

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AidaGlass

Senior Member
Persian-Iran
Hello.
I'm wondering if any of the sentences in italics is idiomatic. The customer wants to say "I expect you to help me carry the desk into my home. I believe it's your duty to help customers carry goods into their home."

The customer and the delivery driver are at the customer's door.
Customer: Now we need to move the desk into my home.
Delivery driver: Yeah, you need to find someone to help you with this. Is there anyone in your house who can help you carry the desk?
Customer: What are you here for, then?/What are you good for then?
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Good for" certainly does not fit, and "here for" is inappropriate since it is clear that the person is there to deliver the furniture, which they have just done. I think this is best dealt with using a direct question rather than a snide remark: "Aren't you going to help me then?" or "Can't you help me?"
     
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