What C is to D, (so) A is to B. As C is to D, (so) A is to B.

younghon

Senior Member
Korean - Korea
A is to B as C is to D= A is to B what C is to D = What C is to D, (so) A is to B. = Just as C is to D, so is A to B. =As C is to D, (so) A is to B.

**A Do for B What C do for D.

Q:Hi! I'm a man who learn English in Korea. I have some questions.

1. What C is to D, (so) A is to B.
Can we put so in above sentence?

2. As C is to D, (so) A is to B.
Can we put so in above sentence?

3. A Do for B What C do for D.
<-----Out-of-scope question removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->

Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Your sentences 1 and 2 are better with 'so' in them.

    I think your sentence 3 is only possible with the verb in the singular:
    A does for B what C does for D.

    Studying does for your brain what running does for your body (i.e. exercises it)
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    1. What C is to D, (so) A is to B.
    Can we put so in above sentence?
    I wouldn't. "What C is to D" does not mean the same as "As C is to D".
    2. As C is to D, (so) A is to B.
    Can we put so in above sentence?
    Yes, and with so, you can invert:

    2'. As C is to D, so is A to B.

    "So" here means "as C is to D", so it is redundant, but it provides emphasis (like "just as" instead of plain "as") and is acceptable.
    3. A do for B what C do for D.
    This is fine too, assuming "A" and "C" represent something plural.
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    2'. As C is to D, so is A to B.

    "So" here means "as C is to D", so it is redundant, but it provides emphasis (like "just as" instead of plain "as") and is acceptable.
    Do you mean As C is to D is A to B is the original, natural, construction?


    (I wouldn't use so in 1 either.)

    Thanks.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with Chez on including "so" in (1) and (2) and I am a little puzzled by Forero's suggestion of inverting the second clause in (2), so I wonder if "as...so..." is used differently in American English. I think it works far better using exactly the same structure for both clauses.

    A and C need to be plural in (3), or you can change "do" to "does" and use singular terms. You can also have plural in one clause and singular in the other.
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    (2) and I am a little puzzled by Forero's suggestion of inverting the second clause in (2), so I wonder if "as...so..." is used differently in American English. I think it works far better using exactly the same structure for both clauses.
    Surprising! I find the inversion perfectly natural and that's how I would write that.
     

    younghon

    Senior Member
    Korean - Korea
    I think Uncle Jack's opinion is right that it is better to use exactly the same structure for both clauses and I understand that 'so is A to B' is inversion.
    Am I right? I undestand' so is A to B' is an inversion.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Do you mean As C is to D is A to B is the original, natural, construction?
    No. I mean that "so" means "in that (very) way", which in context means "(just) as C is to D". "So" is adverbial and allows inversion. "As C is to D" also allows inversion, but not as readily as "so".
    I think Uncle Jack's opinion is right that it is better to use exactly the same structure for both clauses and I understand that 'so is A to B' is inversion.
    Am I right? I undestand' so is A to B' is an inversion.
    The natural order is "A is to B as C is to D." Putting "As C is to D" first changes the emphasis, adding "so" adds stress, and inverting after "so" enforces the intended meaning of "so".

    Which structure is "better" depends on the intent of the writer.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top