What did you it is ? OR Did you say what it is?

Tae-Bbong-Ea

Senior Member
Korean
Hello experts!

As far as I know, Verbs like guess, suppose, believe, think, imagine usually follow WH-words like this patterns.
For example)
1. Did you know what it is ? (O. Right)


3. What do you know he said (X, Wrong)

4. Did you think what it is ? (X, Wrong)

5. What did you think it is ? (O, Right)


However, What about "Verb say, speak, talk ?"... I am curious about which one is correct...

A. Did you say what it was ?

B. What did you say it was ?


C. (I have no idea of a certain sentence using Verb speak, could you give me some examples?)

D. (I have no idea of a certain sentence using Verb speak, could you give me some examples?)

E. Did you talk about what it was ?

F. What did you talk about it was? --> Now I found out what my wrong point is.


Which one is correct ?
 
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  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You’ve presented us with a strange mix of sentences, none of which reads well, in my opinion. While it is possible to say something like “Did you talk about what it is?”, the more natural way to say that is to make the verb tenses agree: “Did you talk about what it was?”.
     

    Tae-Bbong-Ea

    Senior Member
    Korean
    You’ve presented us with a strange mix of sentences, none of which reads well, in my opinion. While it is possible to say something like “Did you talk about what it is?”, the more natural way to say that is to make the verb tenses agree: “Did you talk about what it was?”.
    Dear lingobingo
    Ah sorry.. now i've reveised it.. Could you look at the sentences again?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Talk is intransitive in most of its uses – that is, it doesn’t take a direct object. So to convey the subject being discussed, we use a preposition such as about (or, in formal contexts, on). The verb speak has a slightly different nuance but is used in the same way grammatically.

    Does she ever talk/speak about the accident? · Yes, she often talks/speaks to us about what happened.
    Our boss has been asked to talk/speak on the subject at the conference next week.

    Say works differently. It takes a direct object in expressions such as “The baby said his first word yesterday”, “If you have nothing nice to say, don’t say anything”. Otherwise, it usual takes a clause, e.g. “They say [that] exercise is good for you”, “He said [that] he would be late”.

    As a pronoun, what can stand in for the actual thing that someone is saying or is talking/speaking about. So your examples A, B and E (using the noun phrase “what it was”) are all fine (but F is nonsensical because you’ve tried to use what in two conflicting ways). The pronoun who can be used if the subject of the conversation is a person.


    What did he say? · He said [that] we don’t yet know / What he said was {that we don’t yet know}
    Who are you two talking about? · We’re talking about the boss / The boss is who we’re talking about
    What they said was exactly what I was thinking
     

    Tae-Bbong-Ea

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Talk is intransitive in most of its uses – that is, it doesn’t take a direct object. So to convey the subject being discussed, we use a preposition such as about (or, in formal contexts, on). The verb speak has a slightly different nuance but is used in the same way grammatically.
    Does she ever talk/speak about the accident? · Yes, she often talks/speaks to us about what happened.
    Our boss has been asked to talk/speak on the subject at the conference next week.

    Say works differently. It takes a direct object in expressions such as “The baby said his first word yesterday”, “If you have nothing nice to say, don’t say anything”. Otherwise, it usual takes a clause, e.g. “They say [that] exercise is good for you”, “He said [that] he would be late”.

    As a pronoun, what can stand in for the actual thing that someone is saying or is talking/speaking about. So your examples A, B and E (using the noun phrase “what it was”) are all fine (but F is nonsensical because you’ve tried to use what in two conflicting ways). The pronoun who can be used if the subject of the conversation is a person.


    What did he say? · He said [that] we don’t yet know / What he said was {that we don’t yet know}
    Who are you two talking about? · We’re talking about the boss / The boss is who we’re talking about
    What they said was exactly what I was thinking
    Dear lingobingo

    Regarding your precious feedback "(but F is nonsensical because you’ve tried to use what in two conflicting ways)."
    F. What did you talk about it was?
    Ah just right now, I have realized what my wrong point is.

    What did you talk [----] about it was [----]?

    Because <what> can fill up only one place in the sentence, not two places right ?

    So F. sentence is wrong... I see !

    In addition, I have further question.

    Is A. sentence(A. Did you say what it was ?) really really possible?
    As far as I know, Say verb has the similar structure to the one of Think verb.
    Because,, Native speakers don't say "Did you think What it is - X Wrong?" , Instead, Native speakers say "What did you think it is - O Correct"

    So I am still doubt about whether A. sentence(A. Did you say what it was ?)is possible or not.
    If yes,,,,
    how about A-1. Did you say what was it ?
    I
    s A-1. sentence possible?
     
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